SWIFT-BAT 70 MONTH HARD X-RAY SURVEY

The 70 Month Swift-BAT All-Sky Hard X-Ray Survey

W. H. Baumgartner11affiliation: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 22affiliation: Joint Center for Astrophysics, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250 44affiliation: CRESST/ Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, 10211 Wincopin Circle, Suite 500, Columbia, MD 21044 , J. Tueller11affiliation: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 , C. B. Markwardt11affiliation: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 , G. K. Skinner11affiliation: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 33affiliation: Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland College Park, College Park, MD 20742 44affiliation: CRESST/ Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, 10211 Wincopin Circle, Suite 500, Columbia, MD 21044 66affiliation: Max-Planck Institut für extraterrestriche Physik, 85748 Garching, Germany ,
S. Barthelmy11affiliation: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 , R. F. Mushotzky33affiliation: Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland College Park, College Park, MD 20742 , P. Evans55affiliation: X-Ray and Observational Astronomy Group/ Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7RH, United Kingdom , N. Gehrels11affiliation: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771
Abstract

We present the catalog of sources detected in 70 months of observations of the BAT hard X-ray detector on the Swift gamma-ray burst observatory. The Swift-BAT 70 month survey has detected 1171 hard X-ray sources (more than twice as many sources as the previous 22 month survey) in the 14–195 keV band down to a significance level of 4.8, associated with 1210 counterparts. The 70 month Swift-BAT survey is the most sensitive and uniform hard X-ray all-sky survey and reaches a flux level of 1.03 ergs sec cm over 50% of the sky and 1.34 ergs sec cm over 90% of the sky. The majority of new sources in the 70 month survey continue to be AGN, with over 700 in the 70 month survey catalog.

As part of this new edition of the Swift-BAT catalog, we also make available 8-channel spectra and monthly-sampled lightcurves for each object detected in the survey at the Swift-BAT 70 month website.111http://swift.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/swift/results/bs70mon/

Subject headings:
Catalogs — Survey: X-rays
journal: (submitted to the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series 16 Nov 2012)77affiliationtext: Corresponding author: whbaumga@alum.mit.edu

1. Introduction

The Swift Gamma-ray burst observatory (Gehrels et al., 2004) was launched in November 2004, and has been continually observing the hard X-ray (14–195 keV) sky ever since with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). We have previously published BAT survey catalogs covering the first three months of data (Markwardt et al., 2005), AGN detected in the first 9 months of data (Tueller et al., 2008), and a complete catalog of sources detected in the first 22 months of data (Tueller et al., 2010). This paper extends this work to include all sources detected in the first 70 months of data between December 2004 and September 2010.

The main advances of the BAT 70 month survey compared to previous Swift-BAT surveys include better sensitivity resulting from a complete reprocessing of the data with an improved data reduction pipeline, the publication of 8 channel spectra, lightcurves sampled every month throughout the mission, and a lower flux threshold resulting from nearly a factor of three more integration time.

Hard X-ray source catalogs have also been published based on observations from the INTEGRAL satellite (Bird et al., 2010; Krivonos et al., 2010) and on independent analyses of Swift-BAT data by the Palermo group (Cusumano et al., 2010A, B) and by Ajello et al. (2012); Burlon et al. (2011); Voss & Ajello (2010). The INTEGRAL-based surveys benefit from the somewhat better angular resolution of the IBIS instrument ( arcmin versus 19.5 arcmin FWHM for BAT); however, the much narrower field of view of IBIS coupled with their observing strategy limits the uniformity of the IBIS sky coverage. This leads to lower sensitivity than BAT surveys over much of the sky away from the galactic plane. In the BAT surveys the exposure is not biased towards the galactic plane, which leads to deeper and more uniform coverage of evenly distributed objects like AGN.

The Swift-BAT 70 month survey has paid special attention to compiling a uniform catalog by using a well-defined significance threshold and energy band for inclusion of sources into the catalog. Particular attention has been paid to the identification of sources, for which examination of 3–10 keV X-ray data is crucial. The BAT survey catalogs of Cusumano et al. (2010A) and Cusumano et al. (2010B) often base their counterpart identification on nearby ROSAT sources; Tueller et al. (2010) have shown that the soft X-ray (0.1–2 keV) ROSAT fluxes are not well correlated with BAT fluxes and could lead to incorrect counterpart associations, especially in the galactic plane. The BAT catalogs of Ajello et al. (2012); Burlon et al. (2011); Voss & Ajello (2010) often use the counterpart associations of Cusumano et al. (2010B), and utilize only part (15–55 keV) of the full BAT energy band (14–195 keV).

Section 3 describes the data reduction and analysis techniques used in the 70 month BAT survey, concentrating on the improvements made in the data reduction pipeline. Section 4 presents the 70 month catalog of detected sources, spectra, light curves, and a characterization of the properties of the survey.

2. The Swift Mission and the BAT Instrument

The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on the Swift gamma-ray burst observatory is a large coded-mask telescope optimized to detect transient GRBs and is designed with a very wide field of view of  degrees. Swift’s general observation strategy is to observe pre-planned targets with the narrow field of view X-ray telescope (XRT, which is co-aligned with BAT) until a new GRB is discovered by BAT, at which time Swift automatically slews to the new GRB to follow up with the narrow field instruments for a couple of days until the X-ray afterglow is below the XRT detection limit. This observation strategy is also very well suited for conducting an all sky survey with BAT.

The Swift-BAT survey’s most important feature in comparison to the similar INTEGRAL survey (Bird et al., 2010; Krivonos et al., 2010) is its uniform sky coverage. The very wide instantaneous field of view ( 1/6 of the entire sky at 5% partial coding) allows coverage of a relatively very large fraction of the sky with each pointing. The effectively random pointing plan caused by GRB observations and followup enables coverage of all parts of the sky. The combination of these two properties results in very uniform coverage of the entire sky.

Figure 1.— Exposure in the 70 month Swift-BAT survey. The left panel shows the distribution of observations times across the sky, the center panel shows an all-sky exposure map in a galactic projection (with greyscale indicating megaseconds of exposure), and the right panel shows the fraction of sky covered as a function of exposure time). The areas of highest exposure in the all sky map are near the ecliptic poles because of Swift’s sun and moon avoidance constraints.

Figure 1 illustrates the sky coverage in the 70 month survey. The center panel is an all-sky exposure map in galactic coordinates, with the ecliptic plane marked. Swift’s pointing constraints (primarily the sun and moon constraints) lead to areas of highest exposure at the ecliptic poles. The first panel in Figure 1 shows the distribution of exposure times in the survey, and the third panel shows the fraction of the sky covered as a function of exposure time. Over 50% of the sky has been observed by Swift-BAT for over 9.45 Ms in the 70 month survey, while 90% of the sky is covered at the 7.25 Ms level.

Table 1 provides some instrument parameters for Swift-BAT. A full description of the BAT instrument can be found in Barthelmy et al. (2005).

Parameter Value Comment
Energy Range 14–195 keV
Field of View 0% partial coding
2.29 sr  5% partial coding
1.18 sr 50% partial coding
0.34 sr 95% partial coding
Point Spread Function 19.5′ Mosaicked sky maps
22′ in center of snapshot FOV
14′ at corners of snapshot FOV
Detector Area 5243 cm 32,768 CdZnTe detectors,
4 mm 4 mm 2 mm
Aperture 50% open Coded mask, random pattern
Coded Mask tiles 5 mm 5 mm 1 mm Pb
Pointing constraints Sun
Earth limb
Moon
Table 1Swift-BAT Instrument Parameters

3. Procedure

The data reduction and analysis for the BAT 70 month survey are based on the procedures used in the BAT 22 month survey. The complete analysis pipeline is described in the BAT 22 month paper, Tueller et al. (2010).

The data analysis and catalog generation process can be briefly summarized as follows: The data from each snapshot (a single Swift pointing of  minutes) are extracted in the eight bands listed in Table 2 and combined into all-sky mosaic images. The eight band mosaics are combined into a total band map and a blind search for sources is done by finding all pixels above the 4.8 detection threshold that are higher than each of their immediately surrounding neighbors. Then we use the rough positions of these blind sources as inputs to a stage where we more carefully fit for the BAT positions of these sources. After that, we identify counterparts to the blind sources by searching archival X-ray images from high resolution instruments like Swift-XRT, Chandra, and XMM-Newton. This step allows the identification of previously-known X-ray sources as well as uncataloged X-ray point sources that can be checked against databases such as SIMBAD and NED for associations with objects in other wavebands (such as galaxies in the 2MASS extended source catalog).

Finally we associate the blind sources with counterparts by searching the counterparts list for objects within a fixed match radius of each blind source.

Band Low High Crab Rate Crab Crab
[keV] [keV] Rateaa[ cts s detector]. Errorbb[ cts s detector]. Computed from the rms noise in a large annulus around the Crab (see §4.3). FluxccCalculated from Equation 5, in units of [ergs scm. WeightsddThese weights are used when combining the 8 individual band maps into the total band map for source detection purposes. See § 3.5.
1 14 20 101.7 2.0 3.81 27.000
2 20 24 57.0 1.3 1.87 35.260
3 24 35 100.0 2.2 3.71 22.700
4 35 50 60.1 1.5 3.32 29.444
5 50 75 48.7 1.5 3.56 21.272
6 75 100 17.9 1.1 2.40 16.062
7 100 150 9.3 1.0 3.21 8.449
8 150 195 1.4 0.7 1.98 2.630
Table 2Energy Bands in the Swift-BAT 70 Month Survey

3.1. Data Processing Improvements

We have kept the data reduction procedures in the 70 month survey the same as in the 22 month survey except for improvements in these areas: a gain correction for each of the individual CZT detectors, a more thorough cleaning of bright sources from the snapshot images, and a finer pixelization in the mosaicked all-sky maps.

These changes have necessitated a complete reprocessing of all the data from the entire BAT survey to ensure uniformity and homogeneity. This complete reprocessing is different from our past procedure of processing new data periodically (on a several month time scale) and incorporating improvements to the data reduction pipeline before each processing run of new data. The current complete reprocessing of all the data for the 70 month survey should lead to more homogeneous results and a more uniform survey than the incremental processing used for preparing previous catalogs.

We have also introduced minor changes in the data analysis and catalog generation procedures. These include the handling of confused sources, the fitting of spectra and the calculation of the flux, the match radius for finding counterparts, computing the spectral index instead of hardness ratio, and the use of new Crab-derived weights for combining energy bands for source detection. These changes are described in Sections 4 and 3.5.

3.2. Gain Correction

Analysis of BAT calibration spectra over the course of the Swift mission shows that the detector energy channel containing the 59.5 keV peak from the Am tagged source has gradually shifted as a function of time (see Figure 2).

Figure 2.— BAT detector gain as function of time through out the first 58 months of the Swift mission. The -axis is the offset (in keV) between the location of the measured and nominal 59.5 keV line from the Am calibration source. The -axis is broken down into successive three month periods in which a black point is plotted for each of the 32,768 detector elements in the BAT array. The red crosses are the 3 month averages (and rms spread) for all the detectors in the entire BAT array.

This shift of up to about 3% in the BAT energy scale is due to a continuing small decrease in the gains of the individual CZT detectors. The data processing pipeline used in the analysis of 9 month and 22 month versions of the Swift-BAT survey catalog did not take this gain variation into account, leading to slightly low energies being assigned to the detected X-rays.

For most detectors, this lead to a small change in the fluxes detected in each of the 8 spectral channels—individual photons had too low of an energy assigned to them, and counts shifted to lower channels or below the low energy threshold. Detector to detector variations in gain also cause imaging noise as counts from different energy bands fall into and out of the expected mask shadow in the detector plane.

In order to correct for the gain decreases in BAT, we have fit the position of the peak channel of the 59.5 keV calibration line as a function of time throughout the mission. We then use the peak channel position to determine a gain correction factor for each detector as a function of time. This gain correction factor is then used to correct the bin edge location in channel space of the BAT energy bands.

The physical origins of the gain shifts in CZT are not fully known. A leading hypothesis is that over time radiation damage creates more charge traps in the CZT, reducing the charge collection efficiency and hence reducing the gain. There is also some indication that pixels with the best charge collection properties at launch suffered the largest gain decreases over time, while pixels with lower charge collection efficiencies (and products) suffer less from gain decreases. The differing susceptibility of each pixel to gain shifts over time is what causes the broadening in the pixel gain distribution.

We correct for these gain shifts on a pixel-by-pixel basis using energy calibration data from the tagged source as described above. The spectra in this paper are taken from 8 broad energy bands, and so are not expected to suffer noticeably from response broadening due to differing reductions in CZT gain.

3.3. Cleaning of Bright Sources

During the course of the BAT survey data processing, skymaps are generated from each spacecraft pointing and then combined into mosaicked maps. In order to reduce the systematic noise present in the maps from the sidelobes of strong sources, the analysis “cleans” bright sources found in the individual snapshot images. This means that if a source is detected in a snapshot image with a significance greater than 6 sigma, we measure its flux and subtract the contribution of a source with the fitted strength. After all bright sources above the cleaning threshold are removed in this way, the cleaned maps are combined into the mosaicked maps and source detection performed to locate sources with lower significance.

The data processing pipeline for previous versions of the BAT survey catalog used a cleaning threshold in the individual snapshot images of 9 sigma. For the 70 month survey catalog, we have lowered the threshold to 6 sigma in order to further reduce the systematic noise in the mosaicked maps due to strong sources.

In addition, we have designated 100 objects as sources that are always cleaned in every snapshot image, regardless of detected significance. These are primarily the brightest sources in the survey, usually galactic and variable. They sources are always cleaned even if they are below the 6 threshold for cleaning in a single snapshot image. This allows us to remove systematic noise caused by these strong sources from the mosaicked maps without becoming vulnerable to unnecessary cleaning of noise peaks as a result of a lower snapshot cleaning threshold.

3.4. Pixelization in Mosaicked Sky Maps

The individual snapshot skymaps are combined into the mosaicked map by interpolating the pixel values from the snapshot grid onto the mosaic grid. In previous versions of the data processing, the mosaic pixel grid pitch was 5.0 arcminutes (the PSF in the BAT mosaicked images can be described by a Gaussian with 19.5 arcminute FWHM). For the 70 month survey we have chosen to use a smaller mosaic grid with a pixel pitch of 2.8 arcminutes. This change to smaller mosaic pixels allows a more accurate determination of source positions and fluxes by reducing the effects of interpolation error when adding the individual snapshot images to the mosaicked images. The choice of a 2.8 arcminute mosaic pixel size results from a compromise between high precision in the mosaicked maps and reasonable computation times for the data processing.

3.5. Crab Weighting

In previous iterations of the Swift-BAT survey, the mosaicked total-band map (14–195 keV) used for detecting new sources was produced by simply summing together the individual maps from the eight energy bands of the survey. This is equivalent to performing a weighted sum across the 8 energies with each band having a weight of unity.

In order to improve the sensitivity of the source detection stage in the 70 month survey to objects with AGN-like spectra, we have adopted new weights derived from the measured Crab count rates in the 8 bands. This has the effect of enhancing detection for sources with a Crab-like power law spectrum. Since most AGN have power-law like spectra with spectral indices of (close to the Crab’s spectral index of 2.15; see Equation 5), we expect this Crab-weighting to improve our detection sensitivity for AGN.

In Crab units, the count rate and noise rate of an individual pixel in the combined map can be represented as and where is the measured count rate in energy band , is the measured Crab rate, and is the measured noise rate. Combining these individual band measurements in a weighted mean (and dropping the subscripts) yields

(1)

where F is the Crab-weighted total count rate in cts s detector. This is equivalent to

(2)

If we express the weighted sum more simply as

(3)

then the weights can be constructed with the following formula:

(4)

Figure 3 shows the sensitivity of the source detection process to the spectral slope used to compute the weights for combining the individual energy bands.

Figure 3.— Source detection efficiency as a function of spectral weighting. This figure shows the change in S/N ratio of a source in the survey when the input 8-band maps are combined into a total band map using weights optimized for a source having a spectrum with a particular spectral index. For example, the blue curve shows that when the weighting is optimized for a source with a spectral index of 1.0, the measured S/N of a source with an actual spectral index of 2.15 is only 80% as high as when the weighting is uniform (weights=1, or simply summing together the 8 bands).

The values for the measured count rate of the Crab in the eight energy bands, the noise, and the derived values of the weights can be found in Table 2.

4. The Swift-BAT 70 Month Catalog

Table 6 presents the catalog of sources detected by Swift-BAT using the first 70 months of data and includes sources at all galactic latitudes. This 70 month catalog and associated data in electronic form can be found online at the Swift-BAT 70-month survey website.

Table 6 lists all the sources detected above the 4.8 level in a blind search of the 70 month Swift-BAT survey maps. The first column is the source number in the 70 month catalog. The second column of the table is the BAT name, constructed from the BAT source position given in columns three and four. In cases where the source has been previously published with a BAT name corresponding to a slightly different location (e.g., a source position from a previous BAT catalog with less exposure), we have used the first published name but have given the 70 month BAT coordinates in columns three and four. If there is more than one X-ray counterpart to a single BAT source, we have repeated the BAT name with an “A” or “B” suffix and used the same BAT coordinates for each of the counterparts. The fifth column is the significance of the blind BAT source detection. The significance was calculated by taking the flux at the highest pixel discovered in the blind search in the total-band mosaic and dividing by the local noise as discussed in Section 4.3. Instances where more than one possible counterpart to a single BAT source is found within the match radius of 22 arcminutes are indicated with ditto marks in columns 2–5. We use the 4.8 significance level as the threshold for inclusion in the survey as discussed in Tueller et al. (2010), since we expect one false BAT detection on the entire sky at this significance level.

The sixth column gives the name of the counterpart to the BAT hard X-ray source. These are often well known X-ray sources, optical galaxies, or 2MASS sources, and are associated with a source detected in the medium-energy X-ray band (3–10 keV) in Swift-XRT, Chandra, or XMM-Newton/ images. If no counterpart to the BAT source has been identified, we give the BAT name from column 2 as the counterpart name. Counterpart determination is discussed in more detail in §4.1. The seventh column gives an alternate name for the counterpart; we list a well known name or a name from a hard X-ray instrument or high energy detection. The best available coordinates of the counterparts (J2000) are given in the table in columns 8 and 9.

The 10th and 11th columns give the 14–195 keV flux of the BAT source (in units of 10 ergs sec cm) and the 90% confidence interval. The BAT flux for each counterpart is extracted from the hard X-ray map at the location of the counterpart given in columns 8 and 9. The flux determination method uses a power-law spectral fit to the flux measurements in each of the 8 energy bands and is described in §4.3.

The 12th column indicates whether there is contamination of the flux measurement from nearby sources. This can be the result of source confusion (two BAT sources close enough together to be unresolved, or two viable counterparts within the same BAT mosaic pixel), or from the presence of a strong nearby source. The number given is the contamination fraction, or the fraction of the measured flux at the counterpart position contributed by other sources. Contamination fractions are given for all sources with a contamination level greater than 2%. The treatment of confused sources and of contaminated flux measurements is described in more detail in Section 4.4.

When a source has an entry in column 12 and is considered confused, the counterpart flux listed in column 10 is an estimate from a simultaneous fit of all the counterparts in the region to the BAT map. In these cases, the error on the flux is not well defined and column 11 is left blank. (See §4.3).

The 13th and 14th columns list the source spectral index and error in the BAT band as described in Section 4.3. The 15th column lists the reduced value from a spectral fit to a power law model (see §4.3).

The 16th and 17th columns give the redshift and BAT luminosity of the counterpart if it is associated with a galaxy or AGN. The source luminosity (with units log[ergs s] in the 14–195 keV band) is computed using the redshift and flux listed in the table and a cosmology where  km s Mpc, , and .

The 18th column can contain a flag indicating the strength of the association between the BAT source and the listed counterpart (see §4.1.1).

The 19th column gives an integer source class that we have found useful for selecting particular classes of objects (e.g., AGN, HMXBs, etc.). The source classes are listed in Table 4.

The 20th column lists a source type in the form of a short description of the counterpart.

4.1. Counterparts

As mentioned in Section 3 and described in more detail in Tueller et al. (2010), counterparts to BAT sources were identified by examining archival X-ray observations from Swift-XRT, Chandra, XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and ASCA. All point sources near the blind BAT source position (within  arcmin ) were checked to see whether an extrapolation of the fit X-ray spectrum into the BAT band would be consistent with the measured BAT flux. Any such X-ray sources with an extrapolated flux above the BAT detection threshold were checked against SIMBAD and NED to determine a source name and type and saved to a file containing all discovered counterparts.

Where there were no archival X-ray observations covering the BAT source, we submitted the coordinates to the Swift-XRT for a 10 ks X-ray followup observation. In cases where we did not yet have X-ray observations of the BAT source from the X-ray archives or from Swift-XRT, a best guess was made as to the counterpart by checking for likely sources (eg, strong, nearby Seyfert galaxies) in NED and SIMBAD. These cases are indicated in Table 6 using the association strength flag in column 18 as described in Section 4.1.1.

There are a few complications to this procedure. The blind source detection technique used on the BAT mosaics (see Tueller et al. (2010)) does not do a good job of automatically discovering weaker BAT sources close to very strong sources. To guard against this case we checked the BAT mosaics by eye to ensure that all sources detected by BAT are listed in Table 6.

Source detection is especially difficult in the crowded galactic center region. Figure 4 illustrates this problem with the BAT map of the galactic center region. The separation between sources in this crowded region can be on the order of the 19.5 arcminute (FWHM) PSF of the BAT survey. Given this difficulty with source detection and confusion in the galactic center region, we have chosen by hand a reasonable set of the brightest counterparts needed to explain the measured BAT emission in this area.

Figure 4.— The galactic center as seen by BAT. The colors of the sources were derived from the 8-band mosaics: the lowest two bands (14–24 keV) are combined to give a red value for each pixel, 24–50 keV for green, and 50–150 keV for blue. The colors are then adjusted to the Crab spectrum, so that white sources have a Crab-like spectrum, red sources are softer, and blue sources are harder. The grid is in galactic coordinates. The circular regions are centered on the counterparts listed in Table 6 and have a 10 arcminute radius. The PSF of BAT in the mosaicked maps is 19.5 arcminutes.

4.1.1 Counterpart associations

One of the main goals of the BAT 70 month survey is to produce a uniform and well identified catalog of hard X-ray sources in the sky. In order to achieve this goal we have paid particular attention to the assignment of counterparts to the sources detected by BAT. Instead of just cross-correlating the BAT catalog with catalogs from other telescopes, we have whenever possible checked the archives for X-ray observations of the fields containing BAT sources. We believe that this level of effort is necessary in order to produce the most useful catalog for further studies of hard X-ray sources.

An indication of the strength of the association between the BAT source and the counterpart listed in the main table is given by the flag listed in Column 18. This flag is meant to indicate the result of a check of the X-ray archives for a counterpart to the BAT source. Table 3 lists the possible values for the association strength flag, their meanings and the number of sources in each category.

The strongest association is indicated by a value of 0 (blank in the printed table) in the association strength column. These sources have been observed in the medium energy X-ray band (3–10 keV), and images of the fields checked for possible counterparts to the BAT hard X-ray source. Any sources found are checked to see whether their X-ray spectrum extrapolated into the BAT band yields a flux value above the BAT survey threshold. Practically, this is often indicated by the presence of the source in the medium energy X-ray band since most sources found in the total X-ray band (0.5–10 keV) are soft and do not have BAT counterparts. Over 80% of the counterparts to sources in the BAT 70 month survey have been verified with X-ray observations; although 100% of the BAT sources have archival X-ray observations, 20% of the sources have X-ray data that remains to be analyzed.

A value of 1 indicates that the counterpart association has been held over from a previous catalog, but may not have been explicitly checked with X-ray archival data. These are usually very bright or galactic sources.

A value of 2 or 3 in the association strength column indicates an intermediate-level association. A value of 2 means that an examination of an X-ray image found a plausible soft (1–10keV) source, but that this source is weak or nonexistent in the hard band (4–10 keV). A value of 3 indicates that the evidence for the counterpart association comes from another waveband, such as an optical or radio QSO catalog.

A value of 4 in the association strength column means that this source has archival X-ray data but that it has not yet been checked to verify the association listed in the catalog. The association listed is based on the presence of a nearby object in the SIMBAD or NED databases likely to be the counterpart to the BAT source. Such sources are usually bright Seyfert galaxies or QSOs, or bright galactic sources. Past experience with previous BAT catalogs has shown that counterpart associations made in this way and later verified with X-ray observations are correct greater than 95% of the time.

A value of 5 or 6 in the association strength column indicates that the field has been observed in the X-ray band but that no counterpart was found. This usually indicates that the BAT source is transient and not detected in the X-ray observation. Sources on the galactic plane are indicated with a 5, and sources greater than 10from the galactic plane are indicated with a 6.

A value of 7 in the association strength column means that the source has no archival data for observations in other wavebands and that no suitable counterpart has been found.

Flag # in catalog % Meaning
(blank) 1017 84.2 Confirmed with X-ray imaging
1 36 3.0 Old association held over from previous catalog
2 5 0.4 No good hard X-ray source; soft X-ray source
3 4 0.3 No X-ray source; source from another waveband
4 133 11.0 Unchecked or unavailable X-ray image; educated guess
5 2 0.2 No X-ray source; BAT source on Galactic plane
6 10 0.8 No X-ray source; BAT source off plane
7 3 0.2 No association

Table 3Counterpart Association Strengths

4.2. Source Types and Distribution

Class Source Type # in catalog
0 UnknownaaSources listed with the type unknown either do not have any known counterpart, or are associated with sources of unknown physical type. 65
1 Galactic bbSources classified only as “Galactic” are so assigned because of observed transient behavior in the X-ray band along with insufficient evidence to place them in another class. 23
2 GalaxyccSources in the “Galaxy” class are seen as extended in optical or near-IR imagery, but do not have firm evidence (such as an optical spectrum) from other wavebands confirming whether they harbor an AGN. 111
3 Galaxy Cluster 19
4 Seyfert I (Sy1.0–1.5) 292
5 Seyfert II (Sy1.7–2.0) 261
6 Other AGN 23
7 Blazar / BL Lac 49
8 QSOddAGN with BAT luminosities greater than  ergs sec or listed in NED as radio galxies are classified as QSO. 86
9 Cataclysmic Variable star (CV) 55
10 Pulsar 20
11 Supernova Remnant (SNR) 6
12 Star 14
13 High Mass X-ray Binary (HMXB) 85
14 Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) 84
15 Other X-ray Binary (XRB) 17
Total 1210
Table 4Counterpart Types in the Swift-BAT 70 month Catalog

Figure 5 shows the distribution of sources on the sky color coded by source type, with the symbol size proportional to the source flux in the 14–195 keV band. Table 4 gives the distribution of objects according to their source type. Sources classified as “unknown” are those where the physical type of the underlying object (e.g., AGN, CV, XRB, etc) has not yet been ascertained. These sources often have a primary name derived from the BAT position. Some BAT sources of unknown type are associated with named sources discovered by other missions in the X-ray or gamma-ray bands, but are classified as unknown in Table 6 because the physical type of the named source is unknown or because the coordinates of the source are not precise enough to identify an optical counterpart. These sources can be distinguished by having a name in the catalog derived from the observation in the other waveband. The few sources classified only as “Galactic” generally lie in the plane and have shown some transient behavior which indicates a galactic source, but no other information is available that would allow further classification. Sources labeled “Galaxy” are detected as extended sources in optical or near-IR imaging, but do not yet have spectroscopic evidence of being an AGN.

Figure 5.— All-sky map showing classification of the BAT 70 month survey sources. The figure uses a Hammer-Aitoff projection in galactic coordinates; the flux of the source is proportional to the size of the circle. The source type is encoded by the color of the circle.

4.3. BAT Fluxes and Spectra

The fluxes of the counterparts to BAT sources were extracted in the eight BAT bands from the mosaicked maps using the pixel containing the position of the identified counterpart. For sources where a counterpart is not known, we use the fitted BAT position to extract the flux in the eight bands. The errors associated with the flux values were calculated by computing the rms value in the mosaicked maps in an area around each source with a radius of 100 pixels (4.5 degrees). An exclusion zone around the source with radius of 15 pixels (40.5 arcminutes) was applied to the central source and any nearby sources that fell in the background calculation area.

We normalize the measured fluxes in each band to the Crab as described in Tueller et al. (2010) by using the equation

We take the Crab counts spectrum to be

(5)

(see Tueller et al. (2010)). The total Crab flux is then

(6)

After normalizing the 8 band flux values to the Crab, the BAT spectra are then packed into standard pulse height analysis fits files with the appropriate keywords for spectral fitting.

As in Tueller et al. (2010), we fit these 8-channel spectra with a power law model in order to find the flux of each source. We use a BAT spectral response matrix generated by the BAT software batdrmgen that has been Crab normalized to be compatible with the BAT spectra. We use the XSPEC fitting software to fit the 8-channel spectra with the pegpwrlw model (power law with pegged normalization) over the 14–195 keV BAT survey energy range. We list the spectral index and flux determined from the fit in Table 6.

The 90% confidence intervals for the overall flux and the spectral index were found by using the error function in XSPEC and are given in Table 6. For the highest significance BAT sources ( sigma), this procedure does not produce a good fit (reduced ). However, this is to be expected from the very high significance of each data point, the coarse energy binning, and because a simple power law is not a good model for the spectra of many galactic objects. We list the reduced for each source in Table 6 as an indicator of which sources are not well fit with a power law model, but leave a more detailed spectral analysis to a later work.

We present the eight band BAT spectra themselves in Table 5. The printed version of this table lists only a few objects for space reasons. However, the full table listing all the sources can be found in an electronic version on the ApJ website. We also provide pha fits files for all the BAT spectra and an ASCII table at the Swift-BAT survey website.

BAT Name Counterpart Name CaaContamination fraction (see §4.4) 14–20 Errbb[cts s] 20–24 Errbb[cts s] 24–35 Errbb[cts s] 35–50 Errbb[cts s] 50–75 Errbb[cts s] 75–100 Errbb[cts s] 100–150 Errbb[cts s] 150–195 Errbb[cts s]
keVbb[cts s] keVbb[cts s] keVbb[cts s] keVbb[cts s] keVbb[cts s] keVbb[cts s] keVbb[cts s] keVbb[cts s]
SWIFT J0003.32737 2MASX J00032742+2739173 2.72 1.74 1.91 0.84 4.06 1.24 3.34 0.87 1.93 0.83 1.46 0.74 -0.33 1.31 -3.24 2.72
SWIFT J0005.07021 2MASX J00040192+7019185 7.56 1.57 2.90 0.75 4.36 1.12 3.03 0.76 2.24 0.77 0.73 0.70 -0.72 1.21 -3.38 2.48
SWIFT J0006.22012 Mrk 335 12.80 1.72 4.98 0.85 6.59 1.27 3.88 0.85 2.54 0.85 0.97 0.77 1.69 1.34 3.89 2.89
SWIFT J0009.40037 2MASX J00091156-0036551 5.36 1.88 2.58 0.92 2.26 1.40 1.90 0.92 1.76 0.87 0.26 0.79 1.64 1.48 -2.54 3.06
SWIFT J0010.51057 Mrk 1501 14.00 1.83 5.15 0.88 10.30 1.29 5.25 0.85 6.41 0.87 1.95 0.77 2.52 1.43 1.48 2.92
SWIFT J0017.18134 [HB89] 0014+813 8.64 1.62 3.05 0.75 3.61 1.16 2.51 0.77 0.06 0.72 1.39 0.65 2.23 1.19 4.01 2.46
SWIFT J0021.21909 2MASX J00210753-1910056 7.99 1.81 3.58 0.84 7.50 1.26 3.52 0.91 2.73 0.86 0.70 0.80 0.86 1.41 -2.64 2.95
SWIFT J0023.26142 IGR J00234+6141 8.74 1.67 3.59 0.75 5.29 1.14 1.50 0.80 -1.02 0.74 0.40 0.66 1.28 1.22 0.88 2.52
SWIFT J0025.26410 Tycho SNR 17.70 1.67 5.77 0.76 3.96 1.14 1.49 0.78 1.03 0.75 1.85 0.66 1.82 1.21 5.44 2.54
SWIFT J0025.86818 2MASX J00253292+6821442 7.71 1.58 2.14 0.77 3.64 1.14 3.45 0.77 3.34 0.76 1.39 0.70 2.43 1.21 2.06 2.55

Note. – Table 5 is published in its entirety in the electronic edition of this atrticle. A portion is shown here for guidance regarding its form and content.

Table 5Spectra of Sources in the 70 month Swift-BAT Survey

Figure 6 shows the spectra of four representative sources from the BAT 70 month survey.

Figure 6.— BAT spectra of four sources in the 70 month catalog. The line in the plots is a simple power law fit to the data, with the power law index given as in the legend.

4.4. Confused Sources

Sources are labeled as confused in our table (i.e., they have a value in the contamination fraction column of Table 6) when the highest pixel associated with the BAT source in the mosaicked maps (the “central pixel” value) has a significant contribution from adjacent sources. This includes the cases when two possible X-ray counterparts lie within a single BAT pixel and when two BAT sources are close enough that each contributes flux at the location of the adjacent source.

Using the positions of the X-ray counterparts as an input catalog, we determined the contamination fraction of each source by using the mosaicked total band map to simultaneously fit for the intensity of a PSF (a 19.5 arcminute FWHM Gaussian) centered at the location of each source. Using these fit values, we decompose the measured flux at each source location into a contamination rate contributed from nearby sources and a fit rate for the central source. We then compute a contamination fraction,

If the source has a contamination fraction greater than 2%, we list the value in Table 6 and consider the source confused.

The fluxes for sources marked as confused were calculated in a slightly different way than for unconfused sources. Instead of using the measured count rate extracted from the map at the counterpart position, we use the decomposed fit rate extracted in each energy band to form the source spectrum from which the flux is calculated. For these sources we do not quote an error on the flux estimate because the errors produced with this fitting technique are not well behaved. Any source with a contamination fraction greater than 2% can be considered as detected by BAT, but the quoted flux should be considered an upper limit.

4.5. Lightcurves

Another important goal of this paper survey is to make available lightcurves that span the 70 month period of the survey for the sources detected by BAT. In order to achieve this we have constructed all-sky total-band mosaic images for each month of data in the survey. We extract from the monthly mosaics fluxes for all the sources detected in the full survey and use these to construct monthly sampled lightcurves that cover the duration of the survey.

Figure 7 shows four representative lightcurves from the BAT 70 month survey.

Figure 7.— Lightcurves of four sources from the 70 month catalog.

The fourth panel of the figure shows the lightcurve of the Crab. The error bars on the data points are constructed from the local noise in the monthly mosaic image and are representative of the statistical error associated with each data point. The five points with very large error bars result from times when the Sun is near the Crab’s position in the sky and Swift is constrained against pointing in that direction, resulting in smaller exposure times and larger error bars.

Wilson-Hodge et al. (2011) has shown that the flux of the Crab in the BAT band is not constant, but shows variations of  10% over timescales of order one year. This behavior matches what we see in the BAT lightcurve of the Crab. As in Wilson-Hodge et al. (2011), we estimate the systematic errors in the BAT lightcurves to be % of the source flux by assuming that the long-term (months-to-years) variations in the Crab light curve are due to real variations in the Crab, and that the shorter term variations around that trend are representative of the systematic error in the measurements.

The lightcurves for each source detected in the survey can be found at the Swift-BAT website.

5. Survey Characterization

5.1. Source Positional Uncertainty

In order to judge the accuracy of the BAT positions, we plot in Figure 8 the angular separation between the BAT position and the counterpart position against the significance of the BAT source detection.

Figure 8.— The BAT position error as a function of the BAT detection significance. The angular separation between the counterpart position and the fitted BAT position is used to determine a measured position error for each source. Sources closer than from the galactic plane and galaxy clusters were not included. The measured position error is plotted as a function of BAT detection significance. The dashed line in the plot shows the 91% error radius as a function of BAT source detection significance (see § 5.1).

In Figure 8 we also plot a line showing our estimate of the BAT position uncertainty for a given source significance. This estimate for the error radius (in arcminutes) can be represented with the function

(7)

where is the BAT detection significance. This empirical function includes a systematic error of 0.3 arcmin deduced from the position errors of very significant sources. This systematic error is consistent with differential aberration across the very large BAT FOV and with small offsets caused by the slightly energy dependent focal length of the BAT. 91% of the BAT sources not on the galactic plane () have counterparts that are within this position error radius.

5.2. Measured and Theoretical Sensitivity and Systematic Errors

In this section we compare the expected errors with the actual measured noise in the final mosaic maps.

5.2.1 Exposure and Noise and Systematic Errors

The observed noise in the 70 month survey can be considered to contain a primary component related to the statistical uncertainty (dominated by the exposure time), and a systematic component caused by things like the incomplete cleaning of bright sources from the maps. Figure 9 shows the exposure-corrected noise map for the 70 month survey.

Figure 9.— Systematic noise map for the BAT 70 month survey in galactic coordinates. The contours are in arbitrary units. The measured noise map was exposure corrected in order to highlight the systematic error contributions. The highest noise levels (and lowest sensitivity) are in the galactic center area which contains many bright sources.

With the statistical component of the noise removed, the systematic noise component can be seen concentrated in the center of the galactic plane near the location of many of the brightest sources in the sky. This suggests that the dominant contribution to the systematic noise is from incomplete cleaning of bright sources.

5.2.2 Predicted Noise

From the perspective of pure Poisson counting statistics, the uncertainties are governed primarily by the properties of the coded mask and the background (see Skinner (2008) for details). The expected noise level can be expressed as (adapting from Skinner (2008) Eqn. 23 and 25):

(8)

where is the per-detector rate, including background and point sources in the field of view; is the number of active detectors (); is the effective on-axis exposure time; and is a coefficient dependent on the mask pattern and detector pixel size ( for BAT).222In Tueller et al. (2010) a typographical error incorrectly listed for BAT. The partial coding, , enters the expression through the “effective on-axis exposure” time, , where is the actual exposure time. Using the measured and exposure weighted values for the background in each band and the Crab weights given in Table 2,  cts s detector; (the exposure-weighted mean number of enabled detectors); and the measured count rate of the Crab from the mosaics333In Tueller et al. (2010), we used a value for the Crab count rate of  cts s detector. However, this rate was incorrectly based on data taken from the individual snapshot images instead of from the mosaics. of  cts s detector , we find the estimated Poisson noise flux level to be

(9)

The values for and have been measured in the 70 month survey as opposed to only being estimated in the 22 month survey paper, so we believe we have improved our computation of the expected noise.

Using the median exposure time of 9.45 Ms shown in Figure 1, we use Equation 9 to obtain the expected median value for the sensitivity of the 70 month survey of 0.38 mCrab, or 9.2  ergs sec cm using Equation 6.

5.2.3 Measured Noise

The sensitivity of the Swift-BAT survey is determined by the noise in the all-sky mosaic maps. In order to measure the noise and determine the sensitivity we use the method described in §4.3 of calculating the local rms level from the maps in the area around each source. The sensitivity is then calculated in Crab units using the measured count rate of the Crab given in Table 2. Figure 10 shows the distribution of sensitivities measured in the pixels from the all-sky mosaicked map.

Figure 10.— Sky coverage versus sensitivity achieved in the survey. The 0.43 mCrab sensitivity limit (for 50% sky coverage) corresponds to a flux of  ergs cm s in the 14–195 keV band.

The median 5 sensitivity achieved in the 70 month survey is 0.43 mCrab, or  ergs cm s in the 14–195 keV band.

We can now compare the measured sensitivity achieved in the survey to the predicted level computed with Equation 9. Taking the ratio of the 0.38 mCrab median predicted sensitivity to the 0.43 mCrab median measured sensitivity (), we find that the BAT 70 month survey achieves a sensitivity level within 13% of the theoretically ideal performance. In comparison, the BAT 22 month survey achieved a sensitivity within 40% of expectations. This advance in achieved sensitivity between the 22 and 70 month surveys can be attributed to the improvements in the survey data reduction and processing described in Section 3.

Figure 11 shows the relationship between the measured sensitivity and the predicted sensitivity for all four installments of the Swift-BAT survey.

Figure 11.— Measured BAT sensitivity limit for pixels in the all-sky map, as a function of effective exposure time, , for the 3 month (red; Markwardt et al. (2005)), 9 month (green; Tueller et al. (2008)), 22 month (blue; Tueller et al. (2010)), and 70 month (purple) survey analyses. The contours are linearly spaced and indicate the number of pixels with a given sensitivity and effective exposure. The black dashed line represents a lower limit to the expected Poisson noise level (see §5.2). The median achieved sensitivity is within 13% of the predicted value.

The black dashed line in the figure gives the theoretical survey sensitivity as predicted by Equation 9. The contours show the measured sensitivities for the pixels in the all-sky map. The red contours are from the 3 month survey, the green contours from the 9 month survey, the blue contours from the 22 month survey, and the purple contours from this work. The 70 month contours are much closer to the dashed predictions than the 22 month contours, again showing the improvements made in the 70 month data reduction and processing. The small tails in the contours at lower exposure and sensitivity are from areas near the galactic center suffering from higher systematic noise.

The difference between the theoretical sensitivity and the measurements increases slightly at longer times (for the 3, 9, and 22 month samples) because the systematic errors are not decreasing with time the same way that the statistical errors are. But, the 70 month measured data shows sensitivity closer to the theoretical expectation. This is because the newly implemented data processing pipeline for the 70 month survey improves the sensitivity and reduces systematic errors resulting from problems like uncorrected pixel gain shifts.

6. Conclusions

The Swift-BAT 70 month catalog is the fourth published catalog compiled from sources detected in the Swift-BAT all-sky hard X-ray survey. This most recent version of the official Swift-BAT survey catalog contains 1171 sources detected from across the entire sky associated with 1210 counterparts and is the deepest uniform hard X-ray survey ever conducted.

With detections of over 600 AGN in the hard X-ray band, the Swift-BAT 70 month survey catalog contains a valuable reference set of active galaxies in the local universe. In addition to the survey catalog, the database of hard X-ray spectra and lightcurves from throughout the Swift mission will be an important source of information for future studies of galactic hard X-ray sources and AGN.

We would like to acknowledge the help of Mike Koss in obtaining optical spectra and redshifts for many sources in the table. This work has made heavy use of the NED, SIMBAD, and the HEASRAC online databases as well as the private Leicester database of automatic analyses of XRT data for the followup observations of BAT survey sources. And of course, this work could not have been completed without the diligent efforts of all members of the Swift team.

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Num BAT NameaaIf a BAT name exists in the 22-month catalog (Tueller et al., 2008), then that name is used. If there is no 22-month BAT name, then the BAT name listed here is the name that was used to request XRT followup observations (and used in the HEASARC archive). When no previous BAT name for this source exists, we list here a BAT name derived from the BAT position in this catalog. RAbbThe BAT source positions listed here are all uniformly generated from the fit BAT positions of the sources in the 70-month data and are J2000 coordinates. Dec S/N Counterpart Name Other Name Ctpt RAccThe counterpart position is the most accurate position known of the object in the ’Name’ column in J2000 coordinates, and is usually taken from NED or SIMBAD. If no counterpart is known, the fit BAT position is listed. Ctpt Dec FluxddThe flux is extracted from the BAT maps at the position listed for the counterpart, is in units of ergs scm, and is computed for the 14–195 keV band. error rangeeeThe error range is the 90% confidence interval. CffThe Contaminated column indicates what portion of the BAT flux at the counterpart position is contributed by other nearby sources. ggThe spectral index is computed from a power-law fit to the 8-band BAT data. eeThe error range is the 90% confidence interval. hhThe redshifts are taken from the online databases NED and SIMBAD or in a few cases from our own analysis of the optical data. A blank indicates that the object is Galacatic, and a ? indicates that the object has an unknown redshift. LumiiThe luminosity is computed from the flux and redshift in this table, with units of log[ergs s] in the 14–195 keV band. ASjjAssociation strength. ClkkSource class. Type
1 SWIFT J0001.00708 0.261 7.123 6.10 2MASX J00004876-0709117 0.2032 7.1532 13.03 9.05–17.56 2.17 1.75–2.69 0.60 2 Galaxy
2 SWIFT J0001.67701 0.326 77.001 5.41 Fairall 1203 0.4419 76.9540 10.10 6.61–14.08 2.02 1.54–2.60 0.70 0.0584 43.92 4 Sy1
3 SWIFT J0002.50323 0.664 3.332 5.10 NGC 7811 0.6103 3.3519 11.69 7.36–16.64 1.82 1.31–2.39 0.50 0.0255 43.24 4 Sy1.5
4 SWIFT J0003.32737 0.862 27.676 5.03 2MASX J00032742+2739173 0.8643 27.6548 13.00 8.76–17.70 1.66 1.25–2.12 1.00 ? 2 Galaxy
5 SWIFT J0005.07021 1.011 70.327 7.20 2MASX J00040192+7019185 IGR J00040+7020 1.0082 70.3217 12.67 9.38–16.33 2.19 1.83–2.61 0.70 0.0960 44.47 5 Sy2
6 SWIFT J0006.22012 1.580 20.178 10.04 Mrk 335 1.5813 20.2029 18.43 14.79–22.42 2.32 2.03–2.65 0.30 0.0258 43.45 4 4 Sy1.2
7 SWIFT J0009.40037 2.316 0.575 4.99 2MASX J00091156-0036551 2.2982 0.6152 9.26 5.31–13.99 2.14 1.52–2.97 0.40 0.0733 44.08 5 Sy2
8 SWIFT J0010.51057 2.612 10.953 13.35 Mrk 1501 2.6292 10.9749 31.37 26.89–36.08 1.87 1.68–2.07 0.90 0.0893 44.80 4 Sy1.2
9 SWIFT J0017.18134 4.268 81.567 6.58 [HB89] 0014+813 4.2853 81.5856 10.12 7.16–13.58 2.53 2.04–3.14 1.60 3.3660 48.01 8 QSO/FSRQ
10 SWIFT J0021.21909 5.305 19.151 8.54 2MASX J00210753-1910056 PKS 0018-19 5.2814 19.1682 17.28 13.33–21.64 2.06 1.76–2.41 0.80 0.0956 44.60 5 Sy2
11 SWIFT J0023.26142 5.801 61.696 6.21 IGR J00234+6141 5.7000 61.6600 8.43 6.23–11.00 3.04 2.54–3.68 1.70 4 9 CV
12 SWIFT J0025.26410 6.300 64.169 9.68 Tycho SNR 6.2840 64.1650 12.41 10.19–14.97 3.39 2.94–3.95 2.50 11 SNR
13 SWIFT J0025.86818 6.477 68.384 7.45 2MASX J00253292+6821442 6.3870 68.3623 18.24 13.89–22.94 1.65 1.32–2.00 0.40 0.0120 42.77 5 Sy2
14 SWIFT J0026.55308 6.701 53.153 6.61 2MASX J00264073-5309479 6.6695 53.1633 14.16 10.20–18.52 1.78 1.40–2.20 0.70 0.0629 44.13 4 Sy1.2
15 SWIFT J0028.95917 7.159 59.271 48.43 V709 Cas RX J0028.8+5917 7.2036 59.2894 74.72 71.72–77.78 2.51 2.45–2.57 17.40 9 CV/DQ Her
16 SWIFT J0029.21319 7.308 13.318 6.79 [HB89] 0026+129 7.3067 13.2675 12.50 8.92–16.55 2.25 1.85–2.76 0.50 0.1420 44.83 8 Sy1/RQQ
17 SWIFT J0030.05904 7.667 59.065 6.62 SWIFT J0030.0-5904 SWIFT J003001.7-590246 7.7138 59.0768 14.20 10.33–18.45 1.75 1.38–2.14 0.30 ? 6 0 transient
18 SWIFT J0033.66127 8.403 61.448 7.66 2MASX J00331831+6127433 IGR J00333+6122 8.3266 61.4620 14.11 10.69–17.91 2.14 1.79–2.53 1.00 0.1050 44.60 4 Sy1.5
19 SWIFT J0034.57904 8.626 79.060 5.04 2MASX J00341665-7905204 8.5697 79.0890 6.73 4.44–9.59 2.98 2.33–3.90 1.30 0.0740 43.96 4 Sy1
20 SWIFT J0034.60422 8.633 4.407 7.10 2MASX J00343284-0424117 8.6368 4.4033 16.38 12.14–21.04 1.89 1.55–2.27 0.80 0.0740 44.34 6 Galaxy
21 SWIFT J0036.05951 8.965 59.844 17.54 QSO B0033+595 1ES 0033+595 8.9694 59.8346 24.83 22.22–27.61 2.87 2.68–3.09 0.80 0.0860 44.66 7 BL Lac
22 SWIFT J0036.34540 9.082 45.635 7.24 CGCG 535-012 9.0874 45.6650 15.58 11.71–19.83 1.80 1.48–2.15 1.80 0.0476 43.92 4 Sy1.2
23 SWIFT J0037.26123 9.331 61.342 9.68 BD +60 73 IGR J0370+6122 9.2902 61.3601 17.29 13.96–20.89 2.29 2.01–2.61 2.70 4 13 HMXB
24 SWIFT J0038.42337 9.647 23.599 9.28 Mrk 344 9.6339 23.6133 18.97 14.88–23.42 1.99 1.70–2.32 0.20 0.0249 43.43 2 Galaxy
25 SWIFT J0041.02444 10.143 24.797 5.23 SWIFT J004039.9+244539 NVSS J004040+244535 10.1668 24.7615 7.67 4.88–11.13 2.69 2.08–3.56 0.50 ? 0 SRC/Radio
26 SWIFT J0041.90921 10.463 9.350 5.57 ABELL 85 10.4075 9.3425 5.96 4.16–8.27 4.63 3.40–6.97 0.40 0.0551 43.63 4 3 Galaxy Cluster
27 SWIFT J0042.64112 10.656 41.195 6.83 SWIFT J0042.7+4111 10.6679 41.2002 9.65 7.04–12.75 2.97 2.44–3.69 1.60 ? 7 0 in M31
28 SWIFT J0042.92332 10.709 23.551 21.92 NGC 235A 10.7200 23.5410 47.65 43.30–52.15 1.86 1.75–1.99 2.10 0.0222 43.73 4 Sy1
29 SWIFT J0042.93016A 10.746 30.259 7.14 2MASX J00430184+3017195 IRAS F00403+3000 10.7578 30.2888 7.72 0.62 2.75 0.40 ? 2 Galaxy
30 SWIFT J0042.93016B 2MASX J00423991+3017515 10.6663 30.2976 10.31 1.17 0.96 0.30 0.1408 44.74 8 Sy1
31 SWIFT J0042.91135 10.750 11.569 4.82 MCG -02-02-095 10.7865 11.6010 8.95 5.37–13.19 2.23 1.67–3.00 0.80 0.0189 42.86 5 Sy2
32 SWIFT J0046.24008 11.544 40.094 7.72 ESP 39607 11.5860 40.0970 12.98 9.48–16.88 2.04 1.68–2.45 0.90 0.2013 45.18 2 Galaxy
33 SWIFT J0048.83155 12.217 31.961 73.93 Mrk 348 12.1964 31.9570 156.04 151.87–160.25 1.90 1.86–1.93 6.90 0.0150 43.90 5 Sy2/FSRQ
34 SWIFT J0051.62928 12.899 29.471 5.50 MCG +05-03-013 12.8959 29.4013 9.81 6.20–14.07 2.18 1.64–2.90 1.10 0.0360 43.47 4 Sy1.0
35 SWIFT J0051.87320 12.904 73.282 10.24 RX J0052.1-7319 2E 0050.4-7335 13.0921 73.3181 15.55 12.56–18.84 2.53 2.22–2.87 1.50 13 HMXB
36 SWIFT J0051.91724 12.965 17.425 15.73 Mrk 1148 12.9783 17.4329 29.70 25.89–33.71 2.17 1.99–2.36 1.40 0.0640 44.47 4 Sy1
37 SWIFT J0052.32730 13.044 27.467 5.03 2MASX J00520383-2723488 13.0158 27.3969 8.21 4.65–12.69 2.16 1.51–3.02 2.00 2 Galaxy
38 SWIFT J0053.37224 13.330 72.399 5.06 RX J0053.8-7226 13.4790 72.4460 9.40 6.10–13.15 2.09 1.63–2.67 2.20 4 13 HMXB
39 SWIFT J0054.92524 13.719 25.403 6.81 [HB89] 0052+251 13.7171 25.4272 13.70 9.84–18.04 1.93 1.56–2.35 0.90 0.1550 44.95 4 Sy1.2
40 SWIFT J0055.44612 13.816 46.219 15.41 1RXS J005528.0+461143 13.8329 46.2158 20.62 18.10–23.35 2.99 2.75–3.26 2.30 9 CV/DQ Her
41 SWIFT J0056.76043 14.190 60.720 64.14 Gamma Cas 4U 0054+60 14.1772 60.7167 83.29 81.07–85.55 3.35 3.29–3.42 8.80 1 12 Star/Be
42 SWIFT J0057.06405 14.316 64.026 5.48 NVSS J005712+635942 14.3036 63.9952 10.16 6.91–13.83 2.11 1.68–2.62 1.40 ? 0 SRC/RADIO
43 SWIFT J0059.43150 14.990 31.814 14.43 Mrk 352 14.9720 31.8269 29.98 25.84–34.32 1.94 1.76–2.14 0.50 0.0149 43.17 4 Sy1
44 SWIFT J0100.94750 15.193 47.878 9.36 ESO 195-IG 021 NED03 15.1457 47.8676 16.30 12.68–20.24 2.00 1.70–2.33 0.60 0.0483 43.95 5 Sy1.8
45 SWIFT J0101.50308 15.362 3.150 5.27 2MASX J01012440-0308399 SWIFT J0101.3-0306 15.3517 3.1445 10.34 6.39–15.08 2.09 1.55–2.81 0.70 0.0694 44.08 5 Sy1.8
46 SWIFT J0102.67242A 15.739 72.745 8.96 SMC 59977 IGR J01054-7253 16.1725 72.9013 4.90 2.79–7.33 2.99 2.31–4.16 2.00 4 13 HMXB in SMC
47 SWIFT J0102.67242B XTE J0103-728 15.7212 72.7425 12.13 9.90–14.62 3.16 2.79–3.62 1.20 13 HMXB
48 SWIFT J0103.86437 15.958 64.615 5.33 PKS 0101-649 15.8904 64.6521 11.27 7.21–15.84 1.62 1.12–2.17 0.80 0.1630 44.92 8 FSRQ
49 SWIFT J0105.54213 16.369 42.167 6.22 MCG -07-03-007 16.3617 42.2162 11.97 8.14–16.25 1.75 1.33–2.21 0.70 0.0302 43.40 5 Sy2
50 SWIFT J0106.24704 16.429 47.050 5.13 ESO 243- G 026 16.4082 47.0717 7.25 4.31–10.85 2.41 1.80–3.31 0.40 0.0193 42.79 2 Galaxy
51 SWIFT J0105.71414 16.431 14.237 6.90 2MASX J01053882-1416133 16.4117 14.2704 13.07 9.32–17.34 2.21 1.79–2.72 1.10 0.0660 44.14 4 Sy1
52 SWIFT J0105.63433 16.443 34.571 5.46 HE 0103-3447 16.4442 34.5292 8.56 5.15–12.55 2.28 1.71–3.14 1.20 0.0570 43.82 4 Sy1
53 SWIFT J0106.80639 16.689 6.668 7.77 2MASX J01064523+0638015 UM 085 16.6886 6.6339 15.45 11.16–20.26 2.01 1.60–2.48 1.80 0.0410 43.78 5 Sy2
54 SWIFT J0107.71137A 16.943 11.622 6.84 1RXS J010737.5-113946 16.9075 11.6660 13.51 9.49–18.02 1.94 1.54–2.41 0.90 ? 2
55 SWIFT J0107.71137B 2MASX J01073963-1139117 16.9152 11.6532 10.48 0.26 1.70 1.40 0.0475 43.75 5 Sy2 double source
56 SWIFT J0107.71137C 1RXS J010713.0-113554 2MASX J01071376-1136027 16.8074 11.6007 4.09 1.81 3.03 1.20 ? 2
57 SWIFT J0109.01320 17.185 13.360 13.13 3C 033 17.2203 13.3372 27.78 23.47–32.34 1.94 1.73–2.16 0.10 0.0597 44.38 4 5 Sy2
58 SWIFT J0111.43808 17.853 38.127 11.43 NGC 424 17.8650 38.0830 20.72 17.12–24.57 2.03 1.80–2.28 0.70 0.0118 42.81 4 4 Sy1Sy2
59 SWIFT J0113.82515 18.448 25.286 5.02 87GB 011040.5+250307 18.3446 25.3148 9.89 5.56–15.06 1.79 1.13–2.57 0.40 ? 6 AGN/FSRS
60 SWIFT J0113.81313 18.457 13.239 7.33 Mrk 975 18.4626 13.2717 16.54 12.24–21.33 1.88 1.52–2.28 1.50 0.0496 43.98 4 Sy1
61 SWIFT J0113.81450 18.487 14.835 12.50 Mrk 1152 18.4587 14.8456 27.19 23.04–31.57 1.95 1.74–2.17 0.80 0.0527 44.25 4 4 Sy1.5
62 SWIFT J0114.53236 18.563 32.633 6.85 IC 1657 18.5292 32.6509 14.32 9.95–19.18 1.85 1.41–2.36 0.90 0.0120 42.66 5 Sy2
63 SWIFT J0114.45522 18.575 55.401 8.65 NGC 454E 2MASX J01142491-5523497 18.6038 55.3971 17.46 13.60–21.64 1.80 1.50–2.12 0.40 0.0121 42.76 5 Sy2
64 SWIFT J0116.33104 19.040 31.067 6.20 NGC 452 19.0618 31.0338 11.97 8.31–16.11 2.04 1.64–2.49 1.30 0.0166 42.87 2 Galaxy Pair
65 SWIFT J0116.51235 19.136 12.616 5.35 2MASX J01163118-1236171 19.1298 12.6047 9.75 6.32–13.72 2.24 1.75–2.89 1.40 ? 2 Galaxy
66 SWIFT J0117.87327 19.296 73.443 318.17 SMC X-1 4U 0115-73 19.2714 73.4433 414.67 412.42–416.93 3.30 3.29–3.31 685.60 13 HMXB/NS
67 SWIFT J0117.86516 19.480 65.306 101.36 2S 0114+650 V662 Cas 19.5112 65.2916 157.95 154.96–160.97 2.59 2.56–2.62 17.20 1 13 HMXB/NS
68 SWIFT J0118.56344 19.615 63.736 41.10 4U 0115+634 V635 Cas 19.6330 63.7400 54.38 52.12–56.69 3.29 3.19–3.39 5.60 13 HMXB
69 SWIFT J0122.02818 20.507 28.292 5.97 [HB89] 0119-286 20.4646 28.3492 15.07 10.02–20.87 1.39 0.81–1.94 1.20 0.1160 44.72 8 Sy1, QSO
70 SWIFT J0122.85003 20.612 50.089 7.60 MCG +08-03-018 20.6435 50.0550 12.63 9.52–16.13 2.39 2.03–2.82 0.80 0.0204 43.08 5 Sy2
71 SWIFT J0122.93420 20.783 34.380 9.33 SHBL J012308.7+342049 2E 0120.3+3404 20.7860 34.3469 13.36 10.21–16.92 2.67 2.27–3.19 1.00 0.2720 45.49 7 BL Lac
72 SWIFT J0123.83504 20.944 35.071 28.76 NGC 526A 20.9766 35.0654 63.25 59.04–67.54 1.79 1.70–1.87 2.00 0.0191 43.72 4 Sy1.5
73 SWIFT J0123.95846 20.947 58.785 27.41 Fairall 9 20.9408 58.8057 49.46 45.98–53.03 2.03 1.94–2.13 2.30 0.0470 44.41 4 Sy1
74 SWIFT J0124.53350 21.110 33.775 9.80 NGC 513 21.1119 33.7995 20.35 16.24–24.79 1.90 1.64–2.20 0.60 0.0195 43.24 4 5 Sy2
75 SWIFT J0126.03511 21.473 35.171 5.04 1RXS J012556.6+351039 21.4832 35.1761 9.83 6.23–14.06 2.03 1.53–2.62 1.50 0.3120 45.49 8 QSO
76 SWIFT J0126.21517 21.489 15.275 6.16 RHS 10 21.4919 15.3038 13.36 9.36–17.83 2.00 1.60–2.48 1.90 0.1110 44.63 4 Sy1
77 SWIFT J0127.51910 21.877 19.173 7.39 Mrk 359 21.8856 19.1788 13.32 9.87–17.21 2.36 1.99–2.83 2.20 0.0174 42.96 4 Sy1.5
78 SWIFT J0128.01850 22.001 18.826 8.77 MCG -03-04-072 22.0280 18.8086 19.74 15.39–24.46 1.90 1.59–2.25 0.60 0.0460 43.99 4 Sy1/NLSy1
79 SWIFT J0128.41631 22.098 16.502 6.44 CGCG 459-058 22.1017 16.4593 14.72 10.56–19.36 1.89 1.51–2.31 0.80 0.0386 43.71 2 Galaxy
80 SWIFT J0128.96039 22.192 60.653 5.48 2MASX J01290761-6038423 22.2818 60.6450 9.40 6.29–12.96 2.10 1.65–2.65 0.70 ? 2 Galaxy
81 SWIFT J0130.04218 22.430 42.324 6.06 ESO 244-IG 030 22.4636 42.3265 8.86 6.00–12.23 2.43 1.95–3.07 0.20 0.0256 43.12 5 Sy2
82 SWIFT J0130.24552 22.539 45.843 4.86 2MASX J01302127-4601448 22.5887 46.0292 6.72 2.98–11.28 1.58 0.74–2.47 0.70 ? 2 Galaxy
83 SWIFT J0131.83307 22.980 33.071 6.86 ESO 353- G 009 22.9601 33.1193 14.41 10.49–18.74 1.85 1.48–2.25 0.70 0.0165 42.95 5 Sy2
84 SWIFT J0134.13625 23.481 36.504 22.32 NGC 612 23.4906 36.4933 54.99 50.56–59.53 1.56 1.46–1.67 1.20 0.0298 44.05 5 Sy2
85 SWIFT J0134.80430 23.697 4.520 9.32 2MASX J01344565-0430134 1RXS J013445.2-043017 23.6902 4.5036 22.68 18.06–27.62 1.68 1.42–1.97 1.60 0.0790 44.54 6 AGN
86 SWIFT J0136.53906 24.123 39.152 4.85 B3 0133+388 24.1354 39.0999 11.88 7.53–16.80 1.60 1.08–2.15 0.70 ? 7 BL Lac
87 SWIFT J0138.64001 24.659 39.991 32.94 ESO 297-018 24.6548 40.0114 68.66 64.61–72.80 1.76 1.68–1.84 2.80 0.0252 44.00 5 Sy2
88 SWIFT J0138.82925 24.677 29.440 4.90 2MASX J01392400+2924067 IRAS F01365+2908 24.8500 29.4019 6.33 3.08–10.81 2.38 1.54–3.70 0.80 0.0759 43.95 2 Galaxy
89 SWIFT J0140.65321 25.161 53.344 7.98 2MASX J01402676-5319389 25.1116 53.3276 12.44 9.38–15.88 2.25 1.89–2.66 0.10 0.0744 44.23 5 Sy2
90 SWIFT J0142.03922 25.484 39.385 6.57 B2 0138+39B 25.4906 39.3914 13.61 9.58–18.16 1.95 1.53–2.44 0.60 0.0800 44.33 4 Sy1
91 SWIFT J0146.06143 26.548 61.747 25.49 PSR J0146+61 26.5934 61.7509 109.10 103.55–114.71 0.91 0.84–0.99 1.70 10 AXP
92 SWIFT J0149.22153A 27.291 21.858 6.83 2MASX J01485967+2145343 27.2487 21.7593 8.69 0.23 2.14 1.50 ? 2 Galaxy
93 SWIFT J0149.22153B NGC 678 27.3536 21.9973 8.17 0.26 1.86 0.70 0.0095 42.21 2 Galaxy
94 SWIFT J0149.95019 27.384 50.339 5.72 2MASX J01492228-5015073 27.3428 50.2521 12.54 8.36–17.17 1.46 0.99–1.96 0.90 ? 2 Galaxy
95 SWIFT J0151.33610 27.888 36.196 4.96 ESO 354- G 004 27.9245 36.1878 8.22 5.08–11.95 2.23 1.70–2.96 0.40 0.0335 43.33 5 Sy1
96 SWIFT J0152.80329 28.211 3.415 10.71 MCG -01-05-047 28.2042 3.4468 22.86 18.77–27.26 1.92 1.69–2.17 2.00 0.0172 43.18 5 Sy2
97 SWIFT J0154.92707 28.652 27.141 8.93 2MASSi J0154403-270701 28.6679 27.1169 15.33 11.86–19.15 2.20 1.89–2.57 0.40 0.7900 46.65 8 QSO
98 SWIFT J0155.40228 28.841 2.486 5.86 1ES 0152+022 28.8538 2.4712 11.33 7.59–15.62 2.13 1.67–2.69 0.10 0.0820 44.28 4 Sy1
99 SWIFT J0157.24715 29.260 47.272 6.87 2MASX J01571097+4715588 29.2956 47.2666 15.97 11.93–20.38 1.82 1.48–2.18 0.80 2 Galaxy
100 SWIFT J0157.87300 29.298 73.003 5.87 IGR J01572-7259 29.3173 72.9757 8.68 5.85–12.04 2.52 2.00–3.22 1.10 13 HMXB
101 SWIFT J0200.32428 30.122 24.476 5.75 UGC 01479 30.0794 24.4737 14.36 9.76–19.47 1.75 1.30–2.25 1.10 0.0164 42.94 5 Sy2
102 SWIFT J0201.00648 30.262 6.806 35.32 NGC 788 30.2769 6.8155 80.13 75.65–84.71 1.81 1.74–1.88 3.00 0.0136 43.52 4 5 Sy2
103 SWIFT J0202.46824A 30.601 68.393 4.96 2MASX J02021731+6821460 30.5720 68.3620 11.53 0.20 1.20 3.10 0.0119 42.56 2 Galaxy
104 SWIFT J0202.46824B 2MASX J02013241+6824219 30.3850 68.4061 7.68 3.68 1.39 1.40 0.0152 42.60 2 Galaxy
105 SWIFT J0203.12359 30.754 24.033 6.27 1RXS J020301.2-240213 30.7537 24.0367 10.78 7.41–14.72 2.28 1.81–2.87 0.60 0.1781 44.98 4 Sy1.5
106 SWIFT J0206.20019 31.554 0.279 13.74 Mrk 1018 31.5666 0.2914 32.97 28.28–37.88 1.74 1.56–1.94 0.50 0.0424 44.14 4 Sy1.5
107 SWIFT J0207.02931 31.754 29.509 8.11 3C 59 2MASX J02070218+2930459 31.7911 29.5280 17.15 12.94–21.79 1.95 1.61–2.32 0.70 0.1096 44.72 4 Sy1
108 SWIFT J0208.47428A 31.957 74.453 5.69 1WGA J0206.7-7427 SWIFT J020645.7-742745 31.6904 74.4626 5.39 0.33 2.77 1.40 13 HMXB
109 SWIFT J0208.47428B RX J0209.6-7427 32.4010 74.4520 5.12 0.50 2.17 0.50 ? 6 15 XRB in SMC
110 SWIFT J0208.24452 31.980 44.822 5.27 MCG +07-05-016 31.9649 44.8438 10.48 6.99–14.48 2.15 1.69–2.71 1.30 0.0217 43.05 2 Galaxy
111 SWIFT J0208.51738 32.147 17.617 5.22 NVSS J020834-173933 IGR J02086-1742 32.1455 17.6594 9.12 5.62–13.12 1.99 1.49–2.59 0.70 0.1290 44.60 4 Sy1.2
112 SWIFT J0209.51010 32.376 10.161 5.60 ARP 318 32.3805 10.1585 15.43 10.65–20.73 1.50 1.06–1.95 0.50 0.0132 42.78 5 GGROUP/LINER/Sy2
113 SWIFT J0209.75226 32.407 52.459 24.81 LEDA 138501 32.3929 52.4425 51.28 47.43–55.25 2.07 1.97–2.18 1.20 0.0492 44.47 4 Sy1
114 SWIFT J0211.14944 32.731 49.728 5.40 ESO 197- G 027 32.7189 49.6985 7.88 4.86–11.42 2.17 1.65–2.85 0.40 0.0481 43.63 5 Sy2
115 SWIFT J0213.75147 33.485 51.770 5.00 2MASX J02141794+5144520 1RXS J021417.8+514457 33.5747 51.7478 8.02 5.33–11.26 2.70 2.14–3.44 4.00 0.0490 43.66 7 BL Lac
116 SWIFT J0214.60049 33.657 0.777 7.10 Mrk 590 33.6400 0.7670 16.66 12.23–21.56 1.77 1.41–2.15 0.40 0.0264 43.42 4 Sy1.2
117 SWIFT J0214.96432 33.726 64.509 6.80 2MASX J02143730-6430052 33.6557 64.5014 12.23 8.47–16.46 1.83 1.40–2.32 0.80 0.0740 44.21 4 Sy1
118 SWIFT J0215.61301 33.903 13.011 5.34 3C 062 33.9062 12.9918 13.92 9.40–19.01 1.60 1.13–2.09 0.60 0.1470 44.91 4 5 Sy2
119 SWIFT J0216.35128 34.123 51.435 8.23 2MASX J02162987+5126246 34.1243 51.4402 18.96 14.76–23.54 1.90 1.58–2.24 0.40 0.0288 43.56 2 likely Sy2
120 SWIFT J0218.07348 34.319 73.821 13.12 [HB89] 0212+735 34.3784 73.8257 34.51 30.04–39.15 1.55 1.37–1.73 2.20 2.3670 48.18 7 BL Lac
121 SWIFT J0222.65222 35.537 52.354 5.09 1RXS J022206.0+522112 USNO-A1.0 1350.02324516 35.5258 52.3523 8.30 5.58–11.52 2.72 2.19–3.47 0.80 0.2000 44.98 8 Quasar
122 SWIFT J0222.32509 35.593 25.155 4.86 2MASX J02223523+2508143 35.6468 25.1374 15.81 10.58–21.61 1.38 0.90–1.87 1.30 ? 2 Galaxy
123 SWIFT J0223.44551 35.831 45.809 7.44 V Zw 232 35.8913 45.8186 14.70 10.57–19.33 1.97 1.56–2.44 0.30 ? 2 Galaxy triple
124 SWIFT J0225.02312 36.211 23.222 5.93 PKS 0222-23 36.2612 23.2133 10.36 6.84–14.37 2.09 1.63–2.67 0.50 0.2322 45.22 8 QSO Sy1
125 SWIFT J0225.01847 36.272 18.807 12.26 RBS 0315 36.2695 18.7802 31.66 26.82–36.76 1.74 1.53–1.95 1.60 2.6900 48.27 7 BL Lac
126 SWIFT J0225.86315 36.328 63.212 7.94 Fairall 296 ABELL S0261 36.2876 63.2240 14.75 11.18–18.67 1.85 1.53–2.20 1.40 0.0580 44.08 4 Sy1 in Galaxy Cluster
127 SWIFT J0226.42821 36.590 28.329 6.26 AM 0224-283 36.6081 28.3503 13.12 9.15–17.56 1.81 1.39–2.29 1.20 0.0598 44.05 4 Sy1 GPAIR
128 SWIFT J0227.02346 36.745 23.773 6.35 MCG +04-06-043 36.7275 23.7997 10.78 7.20–15.18 2.49 1.93–3.23 1.60 0.0333 43.44 2 Galaxy
129 SWIFT J0228.13118 37.078 31.316 27.99 NGC 931 37.0603 31.3117 60.55 56.46–64.75 2.10 2.01–2.20 3.80 0.0167 43.58 4 4 Sy1.5
130 SWIFT J0230.20900 37.546 8.998 5.47 Mrk 1044 37.5227 8.9979 12.92 8.70–17.65 1.76 1.32–2.25 0.60 0.0165 42.90 4 Sy1
131 SWIFT J0231.63645 37.915 36.666 8.84 IC 1816 37.9625 36.6721 19.25 15.25–23.56 1.71 1.43–2.00 0.80 0.0170 43.10 5 Sy1.8
132 SWIFT J0232.82020 38.193 20.333 12.18 QSO B0229+200 1ES 0229+200 38.2026 20.2882 24.46 20.23–29.00 2.16 1.91–2.44 0.70 0.1396 45.10 7 BL Lac
133 SWIFT J0234.13233 38.598 32.498 11.35 NGC 973 38.5838 32.5056 31.22 26.42–36.27 1.74 1.54–1.96 0.70 0.0162 43.27 5 Sy2
134 SWIFT J0234.60848 38.644 8.774 16.36 NGC 985 38.6574 8.7876 31.90 28.14–35.86 2.13 1.97–2.30 2.70 0.0430 44.14 4 Sy1
135 SWIFT J0235.32934 38.850 29.598 9.09 ESO 416-G002 38.8061 29.6047 22.98 18.57–27.67 1.54 1.27–1.81 0.40 0.0592 44.29 5 Sy1.9
136 SWIFT J0238.25213 39.576 52.225 15.84 ESO 198-024 39.5821 52.1923 29.56 25.84–33.46 1.79 1.63–1.96 0.90 0.0455 44.16 4 4 Sy1
137 SWIFT J0238.56119 39.623 61.317 5.92 2MASX J02384313-6117227 39.6796 61.2896 12.34 8.61–16.44 1.65 1.25–2.08 1.00 2 Galaxy
138 SWIFT J0238.84039 39.753 40.658 8.30 2MASX J02384897-4038377 1RXS J023849.4-403844 39.7040 40.6439 13.36 10.05–17.01 2.12 1.79–2.52 0.80 0.0618 44.09 4 Sy1
139 SWIFT J0240.56118 40.180 61.260 12.19 LS I +61 303 V615 Cas 40.1319 61.2293 28.31 24.02–32.85 1.84 1.63–2.06 0.60 13 HMXB
140 SWIFT J0241.30816 40.275 8.257 12.47 NGC 1052 40.2700 8.2558 29.46 24.95–34.22 1.78 1.58–2.00 0.20 0.0050 42.22 5 Sy2
141 SWIFT J0241.60711 40.393 7.188 5.53 Mrk 595 1RXS J024135.2+071117 40.3954 7.1872 10.86 7.12–15.26 2.29 1.78–2.95 0.70 0.0270 43.26 4 Sy1.5
142 SWIFT J0242.00516 40.501 5.275 5.09 2MASX J02420381+0510061 40.5158 5.1684 12.16 0.06 1.62 0.30 0.0690 44.15 5 Sy2
143 SWIFT J0242.20531 40.575 5.509 5.28 2MASX J02421465+0530361 1RXS J024215.2+053037 40.5610 5.5100 10.04 0.05 2.20 0.90 0.0690 44.06 4 Sy1
144 SWIFT J0242.60000 40.663 0.020 15.64 NGC 1068 40.6696 0.0133 35.09 30.91–39.44 1.91 1.76–2.07 6.70 0.0038 42.05 5 Sy2
145 SWIFT J0243.95324 40.972 53.432 4.98 2MFGC 02171 41.0125 53.4745 8.43 5.32–12.10 2.35 1.82–3.02 0.80 ? 2 Galaxy
146 SWIFT J0244.72433 41.141 24.503 5.05 ESO 479- G 031 41.1989 24.5139 9.05 5.40–13.42 1.99 1.39–2.69 0.60 0.0235 43.06 6 LINER
147 SWIFT J0244.86227 41.274 62.450 40.69 [HB89] 0241+622 41.2404 62.4685 90.54 86.44–94.72 1.90 1.84–1.96 2.50 0.0440 44.61 4 Sy1
148 SWIFT J0245.21047 41.291 10.782 5.77 4C +10.08 41.3061 10.7897 12.78 8.61–17.56 2.04 1.59–2.57 0.60 0.0700 44.18 7 BL Lac
149 SWIFT J0249.12627 42.273 26.473 12.06 2MASX J02485937+2630391 42.2472 26.5109 33.97 28.81–39.40 1.69 1.48–1.90 0.70 0.0579 44.44 5 Sy2
150 SWIFT J0250.44648 42.605 46.772 9.07 2MASX J02502722+4647295 42.6133 46.7915 20.04 15.88–24.53 2.07 1.78–2.40 0.90 ? 2 Galaxy
151 SWIFT J0251.35441 42.636 54.708 8.98 2MFGC 02280 IGR J02504+5443 42.6775 54.7049 27.07 22.28–32.14 1.49 1.24–1.73 0.70 0.0152 43.14 5 Sy2
152 SWIFT J0250.74142 42.677 41.708 6.59 NGC 1106 42.6688 41.6715 18.58 13.95–23.57 1.62 1.30–1.96 1.80 0.0145 42.94 2 5 Sy2
153 SWIFT J0251.61639 42.928 16.633 7.98 NGC 1125 42.9180 16.6510 17.43 13.42–21.80 1.81 1.50–2.13 1.20 0.0110 42.67 5 Sy2
154 SWIFT J0252.16758 42.966 67.974 5.27 2MASX J02513173-6803059 42.8826 68.0515 7.99 4.14–12.52 1.97 1.26–3.10 1.00 ? 2 Galaxy
155 SWIFT J0252.34312 43.053 43.210 5.81 FGC 0351 43.1418 43.1674 13.06 8.71–17.92 1.76 1.32–2.26 0.70 0.0518 43.92 2 QSO/LPQ
156 SWIFT J0252.70822 43.109 8.516 11.93 MCG -02-08-014 43.0975 8.5104 26.07 21.99–30.41 1.95 1.74–2.17 0.90 0.0168 43.22 5 Sy2, hidden
157 SWIFT J0255.20011 43.792 0.166 33.61 NGC 1142 43.8008 0.1836 88.43 83.54–93.42 1.71 1.63–1.78 0.90 0.0289 44.23 5 Sy2
158 SWIFT J0256.21925 44.033 19.436 18.19 XY Ari 2E 0253.3+1914 44.0375 19.4414 36.45 32.46–40.63 2.29 2.13–2.46 0.40 4 9 CV/DQ Her
159 SWIFT J0256.43212 44.091 32.158 14.86 ESO 417- G 006 44.0898 32.1856 30.66 26.85–34.64 1.87 1.71–2.04 1.80 0.0163 43.26 5 Sy2
160 SWIFT J0259.01334 44.756 13.559 5.60 ABELL 401 44.7373 13.5823 7.58 5.83–9.59 4.63 3.75–6.02 0.60 0.0748 44.02 3 Galaxy Cluster
161 SWIFT J0259.94419 44.947 44.335 4.80 2MASX J02593756+4417180 44.9065 44.2884 12.52 7.85–17.90 1.78 1.22–2.41 1.80 ? 2 Galaxy
162 SWIFT J0300.01048 45.001 10.806 8.23 MCG -02-08-038 45.0180 10.8246 17.63 13.64–21.98 1.94 1.63–2.27 1.50 0.0326 43.64 4 4 Sy1
163 SWIFT J0304.10108 45.938 1.136 13.85 NGC 1194 LEDA 11537 45.9546 1.1037 36.58 31.83–41.52 1.68 1.51–1.85 2.20 0.0136 43.18 4 Sy1
164 SWIFT J0308.57251 46.989 72.843 6.76 ESO 031- G 008 46.8972 72.8340 12.43 9.06–16.15 1.94 1.59–2.34 1.00 0.0276 43.34 4 Sy1.2
165 SWIFT J0308.22258 47.012 22.969 4.96 NGC 1229 47.0449 22.9608 10.90 7.03–15.29 1.76 1.29–2.27 1.80 0.0360 43.51 5 Sy2
166 SWIFT J0311.13241 47.777 32.710 5.12 2MASX J03104435+3239296 47.6850 32.6580 8.05 4.72–12.15 2.56 1.92–3.58 0.60 0.1270 44.53 6 Sy
167 SWIFT J0311.52045 47.830 20.749 10.34 RX J0311.3-2046 47.8284 20.7717 23.98 19.79–28.44 1.75 1.53–1.99 1.00 0.0670 44.42 4 Sy1.5
168 SWIFT J0311.87653 47.961 76.882 6.94 [HB89] 0312-770 47.9802 76.8641 12.97 9.37–16.98 1.99 1.60–2.43 0.80 0.2230 45.28 4 8 Sy1.2/FSRQ
169 SWIFT J0311.95032 48.016 50.513 5.07 2MASX J03120291+5029147 1RXS J031202.7+502922 48.0123 50.4874 10.31 6.58–14.69 2.20 1.68–2.88 2.20 ? 2 Galaxy
170 SWIFT J0312.94121 48.224 41.357 5.57 QSO B0309+411 QSO B0309+411 48.2580 41.3330 17.66 12.37–23.51 1.52 1.07–1.99 0.40 0.1360 44.94 4 Sy1
171 SWIFT J0317.20116 49.279 1.250 5.57 MCG +00-09-042 49.2592 1.2550 13.27 9.22–17.86 1.87 1.49–2.29 2.30 0.0238 43.23 5 Sy2 LINER
172 SWIFT J0318.76828 49.532 68.492 7.28 2MASX J03181899+6829322 49.5791 68.4921 17.77 13.57–22.31 1.72 1.42–2.05 0.50 0.0901 44.56 5 Sy1.9
173 SWIFT J0319.74132 49.940 41.518 50.92 NGC 1275 49.9507 41.5117 73.40 70.88–76.00 3.69 3.59–3.80 2.50 0.0176 43.71 5 Sy2/Perseus Cluster
174 SWIFT J0324.83410 51.179 34.176 10.29 1H 0323+342 51.1715 34.1794 29.93 24.79–35.37 1.73 1.48–1.98 0.80 0.0610 44.43 4 Sy1
175 SWIFT J0325.04154 51.252 41.864 5.41 LCRS B032315.2-420449 51.2595 41.9048 8.17 5.20–11.74 2.20 1.66–2.88 0.90 0.0580 43.82 4 Sy1
176 SWIFT J0324.94044 51.292 40.728 6.78 IRAS 03219+4031 LEDA 97012 51.3051 40.6985 19.41 14.42–24.85 1.71 1.34–2.10 0.70 0.0477 44.02 6 double AGN
177 SWIFT J0325.60907 51.369 9.096 5.16 SWIFT J0325.6-0907 51.3915 9.1194 10.77 6.90–15.24 1.98 1.48–2.59 0.20 ? 6 0 transient?
178 SWIFT J0326.05633 51.475 56.564 5.12 2MASX J03252346-5635443 51.3480 56.5957 8.62 5.23–12.56 1.81 1.27–2.42 0.50 0.0602 43.88 2 XBONG
179 SWIFT J0328.42846 52.167 28.718 6.50 PKS 0326-288 52.1522 28.6989 13.23 9.47–17.41 1.84 1.45–2.25 1.10 0.1080 44.60 5 Sy1.9
180 SWIFT J0331.30538 52.724 5.655 5.56 2MASX J03305218+0538253 52.7174 5.6404 11.02 7.47–15.10 2.39 1.93–3.00 1.20 0.0460 43.74 4 Sy1
181 SWIFT J0331.14355 52.780 43.933 47.09 GK Per 3A 0327+438 52.7993 43.9047 77.52 74.32–80.78 2.87 2.79–2.95 5.50 1 9 CV/DQ Her
182 SWIFT J0331.40510 52.850 5.161 5.52 MCG -01-09-045 52.8459 5.1418 12.75 8.60–17.49 1.93 1.48–2.46 0.10 0.0128 42.67 5 Sy2
183 SWIFT J0333.33720 53.324 37.328 9.45 2MASX J03331873+3718107 IGR J03334+3718 53.3282 37.3030 24.35 19.84–29.18 1.98 1.73–2.25 0.30 0.0558 44.26 4 Sy1.5
184 SWIFT J0333.63607 53.405 36.149 34.64 NGC 1365 53.4016 36.1404 64.07 60.54–67.68 1.99 1.92–2.07 10.90 0.0055 42.63 4 5 Sy1.8
185 SWIFT J0334.41515 53.600 15.250 5.81 2MASX J03342453-1513402 RHS 23 53.6022 15.2277 12.46 8.62–16.78 1.85 1.45–2.30 1.10 0.0349 43.55 4 4 Sy1.5
186 SWIFT J0334.95308 53.720 53.194 256.92 BQ Cam EXO 0331+530 53.7495 53.1732 342.40 340.19–344.63 3.86 3.84–3.88 186.70 1 13 HMXB/NS
187 SWIFT J0335.41907 53.815 19.131 4.82 2MASX J03352254+1907282 53.8438 19.1244 13.56 8.54–19.30 1.73 1.20–2.32 0.20 0.1890 45.14 8 Sy1
188 SWIFT J0336.63217 54.134 32.299 13.93 4C +32.14 54.1255 32.3082 43.76 38.43–49.31 1.60 1.43–1.76 0.70 1.2580 47.61 8 QSO
189 SWIFT J0342.02115 55.513 21.227 21.68 ESO 548-G081 55.5155 21.2444 44.46 40.43–48.64 1.93 1.81–2.05 0.80 0.0145 43.32 4 Sy1
190 SWIFT J0345.23935 56.293 39.596 6.82 LCRS B034324.7-394349 56.3022 39.5748 10.36 7.51–13.62 2.39 1.98–2.90 0.80 0.0431 43.65 4 Sy1
191 SWIFT J0347.03027 56.793 30.448 5.75 HE 0345-3033 1RXS J034704.9-302409 56.7729 30.3972 9.16 5.98–12.90 2.24 1.73–2.91 0.60 0.0950 44.32 4 Sy1
192 SWIFT J0349.21159 57.370 11.989 8.91 QSO B0347-121 1ES 0347-12.1 57.3467 11.9908 16.56 12.86–20.65 2.17 1.85–2.53 0.60 0.1800 45.18 7 BL Lac
193 SWIFT J0350.15019 57.585 50.302 9.67 2MASX J03502377-5018354 57.5990 50.3099 20.89 17.03–24.98 1.63 1.39–1.88 0.50 0.0365 43.81 5 Sy2
194 SWIFT J0351.74030 57.931 40.498 7.22 Fairall 1116 57.9237 40.4665 12.06 8.96–15.55 2.12 1.77–2.52 0.70 0.0586 44.00 4 Sy1
195 SWIFT J0353.46830 58.261 68.530 10.26 PKS 0352-686 58.2396 68.5214 15.47 12.44–18.80 2.34 2.05–2.67 0.60 0.0870 44.46 7 BL Lac
196 SWIFT J0353.73711 58.450 37.201 6.50 2MASX J03534246+3714077 58.4270 37.2350 15.33 10.71–20.56 2.14 1.68–2.69 0.90 0.0183 43.06 5 Sy2
197 SWIFT J0354.20250 58.501 2.826 6.33 2MASX J03540948+0249307 58.5395 2.8252 12.85 9.05–17.17 2.25 1.83–2.76 0.70 0.0360 43.59 4 Sy1
198 SWIFT J0355.53101 58.837 31.038 286.23 X Per 4U 0352+309 58.8462 31.0458 675.46 670.84–680.09 2.15 2.14–2.16 238.00 13 HMXB/NS
199 SWIFT J0357.56255 59.086 62.890 7.33 2MASX J03561995-6251391 59.0830 62.8610 12.50 9.31–16.03 2.08 1.73–2.47 1.40 0.1076 44.57 5 Sy1.9
200 SWIFT J0356.94041 59.203 40.704 8.91 2MASX J03565655-4041453 59.2356 40.6960 19.57 15.58–23.88 1.65 1.37–1.93 2.20 0.0747 44.43 5 Sy1.9
201 SWIFT J0357.64153 59.397 41.914 6.30 2MASX J03574513+4155049 59.4380 41.9181 13.53 9.49–18.17 2.26 1.81–2.79 0.70 ? 2 Galaxy
202 SWIFT J0359.03015A 59.807 30.229 7.96 SARS 059.33488-30.34397 59.8354 30.2027 8.42 0.34 2.59 1.10 0.0973 44.30 4 Sy1 LINER
203 SWIFT J0359.03015B SARS 059.28692-30.44439 59.7868 30.3029 10.98 1.53 1.09 1.30 0.0939 44.39 5 Sy1.9
204 SWIFT J0359.75058 59.931 50.965 6.55 4C +50.11 59.8739 50.9639 19.98 14.90–25.44 1.51 1.16–1.86 0.30 1.5200 47.47 8 QSO/LP
205 SWIFT J0402.41807 60.609 18.087 9.77 ESO 549- G 049 60.6070 18.0480 25.16 20.59–30.00 1.60 1.36–1.85 0.30 0.0263 43.60 5 Sy2 Liner
206 SWIFT J0404.03604 60.991 36.065 6.44 PKS 0402-362 60.9740 36.0839 11.38 7.94–15.25 1.98 1.56–2.47 0.30 1.4170 47.15 8 LPQ/FSRQ
207 SWIFT J0405.33707 61.334 37.117 5.46 ESO 359- G 019 61.2570 37.1875 10.80 6.74–15.53 1.65 1.07–2.27 1.80 0.0552 43.89 4 Sy1
208 SWIFT J0405.51307 61.373 13.121 5.37 [HB89] 0403-132 61.3917 13.1371 9.90 6.12–14.39 2.24 1.67–3.03 0.60 0.5706 46.12 8 QSO/HP
209 SWIFT J0407.40339 61.824 3.742 11.92 3C 105 61.8186 3.7072 27.65 23.01–32.61 1.99 1.76–2.24 0.20 0.0890 44.74 5 Sy2
210 SWIFT J0413.31659 63.333 16.988 5.91 MG1 J041325+1659 63.3419 16.9974 16.63 11.55–22.27 1.91 1.48–2.41 0.80 ? 0 SRC/RADIO
211 SWIFT J0413.51027 63.380 10.448 5.03 ABELL 478 63.3362 10.4764 6.62 4.73–8.53 6.20 4.60–9.80 1.50 0.0881 44.11 4 3 Galaxy Cluster
212 SWIFT J0413.81112 63.446 11.207 5.09 3C 109 63.4182 11.2038 13.73 8.71–19.53 1.94 1.40–2.59 0.40 0.3056 45.62 8 Sy1.8/N GALAXY
213 SWIFT J0414.80754 63.710 7.928 12.20 IRAS 04124-0803 63.7195 7.9278 21.00 17.63–24.65 2.51 2.26–2.79 1.60 0.0379 43.85 4 Sy1
214 SWIFT J0418.33800 64.619 38.017 40.74 3C 111.0 64.5887 38.0266 116.80 111.84–121.83 1.98 1.92–2.04 0.70 0.0485 44.81 4 Sy1
215 SWIFT J0419.95600 64.950 55.996 5.52 XTE J0421+560 64.9255 55.9994 8.90 6.17–12.16 2.91 2.36–3.67 0.60 13 HMXB
216 SWIFT J0420.05457 64.973 54.946 11.35 NGC 1566 65.0017 54.9378 21.38 17.72–25.25 1.86 1.64–2.11 1.70 0.0050 42.08 4 Sy1
217 SWIFT J0422.75611 65.622 56.202 10.35 ESO 157- G 023 65.6007 56.2260 21.20 17.47–25.14 1.71 1.49–1.94 1.20 0.0435 43.97 5 Sy2
218 SWIFT J0423.50414 65.891 4.141 10.56 2MASX J04234080+0408017 65.9199 4.1338 23.88 19.50–28.58 2.04 1.80–2.30 1.50 0.0450 44.06 5 Sy2
219 SWIFT J0426.11945 66.493 19.730 5.27 IW Eri 66.4802 19.7584 6.69 4.40–9.60 3.22 2.49–4.39 1.10 9 CV/AM HER
220 SWIFT J0426.25711 66.510 57.219 17.24 1H 0419-577 66.5035 57.2001 24.84 21.95–27.90 2.47 2.30–2.67 1.10 0.1040 44.84 5 Sy1.5
221 SWIFT J0427.61201 66.810 11.991 4.95 SWIFT J0427.6-1201 66.8745 12.0064 12.79 8.26–17.91 1.61 1.11–2.13 1.00 ? 6 0 transient?
222 SWIFT J0428.26704A 67.068 67.091 4.84 SWIFT J042749.42-670436.1 66.9559 67.0767 14.81 0.28 0.95 0.40 ? 0 double source
223 SWIFT J0428.26704B 2MASX J04294735-6703205 67.4538 67.0539 3.21 0.58 3.18 0.50 ? 2 Galaxy
224 SWIFT J0429.62114 67.464 21.189 5.31 2MASX J04293830-2109441 67.4095 21.1622 12.07 7.81–16.86 1.67 1.18–2.23 0.90 0.0703 44.16 6 AGN
225 SWIFT J0431.36127 67.821 61.435 12.01 ABELL 3266 67.7997 61.4063 12.29 10.53–14.28 3.94 3.49–4.52 0.60 0.0589 44.01 4 3 Galaxy Cluster
226 SWIFT J0433.00521 68.292 5.339 36.14 3C 120 68.2962 5.3543 94.36 89.44–99.38 1.95 1.88–2.02 1.90 0.0330 44.38 4 Sy1
227 SWIFT J0433.55846 68.351 58.732 4.89 2MASX J04332716-5843346 68.3638 58.7263 11.01 7.18–15.30 1.64 1.16–2.16 0.60 0.1023 44.47 2 XBONG
228 SWIFT J0436.31022 69.069 10.362 8.93 Mrk 618 69.0930 10.3760 17.75 13.81–22.05 2.05 1.75–2.38 1.50 0.0355 43.72 4 4 Sy1
229 SWIFT J0437.44713 69.338 47.209 7.01 2MASX J04372814-4711298 69.3673 47.1915 13.64 9.94–17.76 1.83 1.44–2.25 1.50 0.0530 43.96 4 Sy1
230 SWIFT J0438.21048 69.553 10.793 8.74 MCG -02-12-050 69.5591 10.7959 18.97 14.89–23.40 1.94 1.66–2.25 0.90 0.0364 43.76 4 Sy1.2
231 SWIFT J0440.25941 70.069 59.691 7.52 ESO 118-IG 033 NED01 69.9960 59.6817 12.47 9.11–16.26 2.08 1.70–2.52 1.10 0.0577 44.00 5 Sy2/Galaxy Pair
232 SWIFT J0440.92741 70.171 27.650 7.37 2MASX J04404770+2739466 70.1989 27.6631 21.36 16.46–26.70 1.94 1.62–2.28 1.00 2 Galaxy
233 SWIFT J0440.84432 70.210 44.536 32.96 RX J0440.9+4431 70.2472 44.5304 74.79 70.40–79.29 2.32 2.23–2.41 0.30 13 XRB/ Be
234 SWIFT J0441.22704 70.312 27.070 6.18 IRAS 04392-2713 70.3441 27.1389 9.93 6.73–13.66 2.28 1.80–2.86 0.50 0.0835 44.23 4 Sy1.5
235 SWIFT J0441.80823 70.485 8.416 5.05 1RXS J044154.5-082639 70.4746 8.4428 10.21 6.51–14.58 2.21 1.68–2.88 0.30 0.0440 43.67 4 Sy1
236 SWIFT J0443.92856 70.940 28.965 13.93 UGC 03142 70.9450 28.9718 45.54 40.11–51.20 1.75 1.59–1.92 0.70 0.0217 43.69 4 Sy1
237 SWIFT J0444.12813 71.000 28.234 16.02 2MASX J04440903+2813003 71.0376 28.2168 52.95 47.39–58.70 1.74 1.60–1.89 0.50 0.0113 43.18 5 Sy2
238 SWIFT J0445.02816 71.122 28.166 8.68 PKS 0442-28 71.1571 28.1651 18.41 14.48–22.64 1.80 1.52–2.10 1.00 0.1470 45.03 8 Sy2 NLRG
239 SWIFT J0446.41828 71.593 18.440 5.36 UGC 3157 71.6240 18.4609 14.32 9.70–19.53 2.01 1.58–2.50 2.10 0.0154 42.88 5 Sy2
240 SWIFT J0449.65515 72.446 55.248 4.88 2MASX J04500193-5512404 72.5082 55.2112 8.56 5.03–12.66 1.75 1.17–2.42 0.20 ? 2 Galaxy
241 SWIFT J0451.56949 72.734 69.809 24.15 SWIFT J045106.8-694803 72.7785 69.8008 36.52 33.60–39.55 2.42 2.30–2.54 6.60 0 New LMC source
242 SWIFT J0451.40346 72.881 3.844 11.36 MCG -01-13-025 72.9229 3.8094 31.11 26.05–36.45 1.73 1.52–1.95 0.60 0.0159 43.25 4 4 Sy1.2
243 SWIFT J0450.75813 72.967 58.180 10.74 RBS 594 72.9335 58.1835 21.22 17.47–25.22 1.85 1.61–2.10 0.20 0.0907 44.64 4 Sy1.5
244 SWIFT J0452.24933 73.016 49.569 23.69 1RXS J045205.0+493248 73.0208 49.5459 63.16 58.27–68.17 1.92 1.81–2.03 1.10 0.0290 44.09 4 Sy1
245 SWIFT J0453.40404 73.354 4.073 10.19 CGCG 420-015 73.3573 4.0616 28.14 23.25–33.35 1.90 1.67–2.14 1.50 0.0294 43.75 5 Sy2
246 SWIFT J0454.64315 73.658 43.253 5.55 2MASX J04544295-4314231 73.6788 43.2397 10.95 7.55–14.78 1.83 1.43–2.28 1.60 0.0877 44.32 2 XBONG
247 SWIFT J0456.37532 74.032 75.520 11.92 ESO 033- G 002 73.9957 75.5412 21.26 17.73–25.03 1.98 1.76–2.22 1.40 0.0181 43.20 4 5 Sy2
248 SWIFT J0457.14528 74.281 45.470 10.80 1RXS J045707.4+452751 74.2846 45.4639 23.07 19.01–27.49 2.49 2.21–2.82 0.40 ? 0 SRC/X-RAY
249 SWIFT J0459.92703 74.981 27.070 8.53 4C +27.14 74.9837 27.1007 24.83 19.89–30.11 1.99 1.72–2.28 1.60 ? 0 Galaxy? / radio src
250 SWIFT J0459.73502 74.981 35.069 5.85 2MASX J04595677+3502536 74.9869 35.0483 15.74 11.06–20.98 1.94 1.54–2.40 0.80 ? 2 Galaxy
251 SWIFT J0501.27041 75.298 70.687 13.60 IGR J05007-7047 75.1919 70.7433 19.65 16.88–22.62 2.56 2.33–2.81 0.90 13 HMXB
252 SWIFT J0502.10332 75.579 3.534 6.01 2MASX J05020903+0331499 75.5377 3.5306 15.31 10.59–20.66 1.95 1.51–2.44 0.70 0.0160 42.94 4 Sy1
253 SWIFT J0502.42446 75.594 24.761 11.25 V1062 Tau 75.6145 24.7564 25.27 21.23–29.63 2.62 2.36–2.93 1.10 12 Nova
254 SWIFT J0503.02302 75.728 23.009 7.23 LEDA 097068 75.7426 22.9977 19.81 15.06–24.99 2.14 1.80–2.52 0.70 0.0577 44.20 4 Sy1
255 SWIFT J0503.72819 75.940 28.342 5.00 1WGA J0503.8-2823 75.8927 28.2815 8.23 4.44–12.79 2.18 1.49–3.31 1.00 ? 0 SRC/X-RAY
256 SWIFT J0504.67345 76.179 73.803 4.97 2MASX J05043414-7349269 IGR J05053-7343 76.1425 73.8242 8.46 4.71–13.13 1.98 1.26–2.90 1.00 0.0452 43.61 5 Sy1.9
257 SWIFT J0505.66735 76.396 67.581 6.95 2MASX J05052442-6734358 76.3517 67.5766 11.81 8.62–15.40 2.14 1.75–2.58 1.70 ? 2 Galaxy
258 SWIFT J0505.82351 76.440 23.855 25.64 2MASX J05054575-2351139 76.4405 23.8539 60.85 56.38–65.43 1.72 1.63–1.82 0.90 0.0350 44.24 5 Sy2 HII
259 SWIFT J0507.76732 76.921 67.527 6.11 87GB 050246.4+673341 1ES0502+675 76.9844 67.6234 10.04 6.89–13.66 2.42 1.96–3.02 0.80 0.3140 45.51 8 QSO
260 SWIFT J0508.11727 77.090 17.412 9.48 CGCG 468-002 NED01 77.0820 17.3630 26.03 21.13–31.30 2.06 1.80–2.35 2.00 0.0175 43.25 5 Sy2
261 SWIFT J0510.71629 77.684 16.507 32.14 IRAS 05078+1626 4U 0517+17 77.6896 16.4989 90.61 85.44–95.88 2.04 1.96–2.12 0.90 0.0179 43.82 4 Sy1.5
262 SWIFT J0512.11830 77.996 18.530 5.97 ESO 553- G 022 77.9908 18.4939 13.72 9.26–18.72 1.82 1.37–2.36 0.70 0.0421 43.75 5 Sy2
263 SWIFT J0513.86627 78.400 66.495 5.55 CGCG 307-007 78.3183 66.4639 11.75 8.04–15.99 2.10 1.66–2.63 0.60 0.0149 42.77 2 Galaxy
264 SWIFT J0514.24002 78.520 40.041 40.25 CXO J051406.4-400238 4U 0513-40 in NGC 1851 78.5269 40.0439 45.86 43.71–48.09 3.48 3.36–3.61 1.70 14 LMXB/NS in globular c
265 SWIFT J0515.31854 78.823 18.908 8.55 2MASX J05151978+1854515 78.8324 18.9143 29.84 24.18–35.84 1.70 1.44–1.97 1.90 ? 2 Galaxy
266 SWIFT J0516.20009 79.049 0.138 29.52 Ark 120 79.0476 0.1498 69.95 65.22–74.80 2.06 1.97–2.16 1.90 0.0323 44.23 4 Sy1
267 SWIFT J0516.31928 79.078 19.470 7.68 2MFGC 04298 79.0947 19.4531 21.57 16.58–27.05 2.11 1.77–2.50 0.50 0.0212 43.34 2 Galaxy
268 SWIFT J0516.41034 79.096 10.555 6.80 MCG -02-14-009 79.0882 10.5615 13.58 9.89–17.71 2.24 1.87–2.69 1.90 0.0285 43.40 4 Sy1
269 SWIFT J0501.93239 79.912 32.677 24.84 ESO 362-18