Comprehensive study of the X-ray flares from gamma-ray bursts observed by Swift

Comprehensive study of the X-ray flares from gamma-ray bursts observed by Swift

Abstract

X-ray flares are generally supposed to be produced by the later central engine activities, and may share the similar physical origin with prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this paper, we have analyzed all significant X-ray flares from the GRBs observed by Swift from April 2005 to March 2015. The catalog contains 468 bright X-ray flares, including 200 flares with redshifts. We obtain the fitting results of X-ray flares, such as start time, peak time, duration, peak flux, fluence, peak luminosity, and mean luminosity. The peak luminosity decreases with peak time, following a power-law behavior . The flare duration increases with peak time. The 0.3-10 keV isotropic energy of X-ray flares distribution is a lognormal peaked at erg. We also study the frequency distributions of flare parameters, including energies, durations, peak fluxes, rise times, decay times and waiting times. Power-law distributions of energies, durations, peak fluxes, and waiting times are found in GRB X-ray flares and solar flares. These distributions could be well explained by a fractal-diffusive, self-organized criticality model. Some theoretical models basing on magnetic reconnection have been proposed to explain X-ray flares. Our result shows that the relativistic jets of GRBs may be Poynting-flux dominated.

gamma rays: general — radiation mechanism: non-thermal

1 Introduction

X-ray flare is one of the most common phenomena in the afterglow phase of gamma-ray burst (GRBs) in the Swift satellite era (Burrows et al. 2005; Falcone et al. 2006; Zhang et al. 2006; Nousek et al. 2006). There are about one-third of Swift GRBs with remarkable X-ray flares. X-ray flares have been observed in both long and short GRBs (Romano et al. 2006; Falcone et al. 2006; Campana et al. 2006; Margutti et al. 2011). Generally, the X-ray flare shows sharp rise and sharp decay. They usually happens at s after the prompt emission (Falcone et al. 2007; Chincarini et al. 2007, 2010). The fluences of most X-ray flares are smaller than the prompt emission observed by Swift/BAT. Their average fluence is about 10 percent of the prompt emission statistically (Falcone et al. 2007; Chincarini et al. 2010). From the temporal behavior and spectral property, it is believed that the X-ray flare is from a distinct emission mechanism, which is different from the underlying afterglow emission. While the temporal behavior of flares is very similar to that of prompt emission pulses. Therefore, X-ray flares may have the same physical origin as the prompt pulses of GRBs (Burrows et al. 2005; Falcone et al. 2006, 2007; Zhang et al. 2006; Nousek et al. 2006; Liang et al. 2006; Chincarini et al. 2007, 2010; Hou et al. 2013; Wu et al. 2013; Yi et al. 2015a). Both X-ray flares and GRBs are powered by the central engine activities, therefore the properties of X-ray flares can provide an important clue to understand the mechanism of GRB phenomenon. Some theoretical models have been proposed, such as fragmentation of the collapsing star (King et al. 2005) , fragmentation of the accretion disk (Perna et al. 2006), intermittent accretion behavior caused by a time variable magnetic barrier (Proga & Zhang 2006), magnetic reconnection from a post-merger millisecond pulsar (Dai et al. 2006), and magnetic dissipation in a decelerating shell (Giannios 2006).

Some surveys on the X-ray flares of GRBs observed by Swift have been carried out. The studies by Falcone et al. (2007) and Chincarini et al. (2007) selected dozens of flares in the early period of Swift. They fitted the X-ray flare with a broken power-law or multiple broken power-law functions, and obtained the fitting parameters of X-ray flares. These studies suggested that flares are produced by late activities of central engine. Follow-up studies with new sample of flares indicated that X-ray flares have some correlations among the flare’s parameters (Chincarini et al. 2010; Bernardini et al. 2011; Swenson & Roming 2014). They confirmed that the late-time internal dissipation origin seems the most promising explanation for flares. Margutti et al. (2011) studied X-ray flare candidates in short GRBs, and found that short GRB flares show similar observational properties of long ones after accounting for the central engine time-scales and energy budget. Besides that, Li et al. (2012) also investigated 24 optical flares from 19 GRBs. They suggested that, similar to the X-ray flares, the optical flares are related to the erratic behavior of the central engine. Guidorzi et al. (2015) found that the waiting time distributions of prompt pulses and X-ray flares show a similar power-law behavior.

X-ray flares are the common astrophysical phenomena throughout the universe. Interestingly, Wang & Dai (2013) compiled 83 GRB flares and 11595 solar hard X-ray flares from RHESSI during 2002-2007 and performed a statistical comparison between them. They found the energy, duration, and waiting-time distributions of X-ray flares are similar to those of solar flares, which suggest a similar physical origin of the both events. This result is supported by later numerical simulations (Harko et al. 2015). Harko et al. (2015) numerically investigated the possibility that self-organized criticality (SOC) appears in a one-dimensional magnetized flow, which can be applied to GRB X-ray flares. Wang et al. (2015) studied the energy, duration and waiting time distributions of X-ray flares from Swift J1644+57 (Burrows et al. 2011), Galactic center black hole Sgr A (Neilsen et al. 2013), and M87 (Harris et al. 2009; Abramowski et al. 2012). These distributions of X-ray flares in different systems show similar power-law distributions. So X-ray flares from astrophysical systems with spatial and mass scales different by many orders of magnitudes show similar behavior, which may indicate that they have similar physical origin.

In this paper, we analyse the ten-year X-ray flare data of Swift/XRT until the end of March 2015, and study the distributions of energy, duration, waiting time, rise time, decay time, peak time and peak flux. This paper is organized as follows. In Section 2, we derive the GRB X-ray flare data from Swift/XRT, and present the fitting results. In section 3, we study some correlations between parameters of X-ray flares. The distributions of GRB X-ray flares and solar flares are discussed in Section 4. Conclusions and discussion are given in Section 5. A concordance cosmology with parameters km s Mpc, , and is adopted in all part of this work.

2 Data Analysis

Since X-ray flares could be happened at any time of the afterglow phase, the X-ray light curves usually contains one or more power-law segments along with some flares. The mix of different components makes the diverse X-ray afterglow light curves. Here we mainly focus on the flare emission. We extensively search for the remarkable feature of pulses at the GRB X-ray afterglow phase. We consider all the Swift GRBs observed between 2005 April and 2015 March, and select 199 GRBs during this period. These X-ray flares generally contain a complete structure, including the remarkable rising and decaying phase. These flares are clearly distinguishable from the underlying continuum emission. We will also apply empirical functions to fit the flare and the underlying component. Small fluctuations around flare have not been identified as flares. The total number of bright X-ray flares is 468, including 200 flares with redshifts. Most GRBs contain a single or several flares. But some of them have more than ten flares, such as GRBs 100212A and 100728A.

The 0.3-10 keV X-ray light curves of GRBs are taken from the website of Swift/XRT (Evans et al. 2007, 2009) 1. We fit the flare with a smooth broken power-law function (Li et al. 2012)

(1)

and fit the underlying continuum with a power-law function (or broken power-law function)

(2)

where , and are the temporal slopes, is the break time, and represents the sharpness of the peak of the light curve component. This method is very similar to the fitting method of Chincarini et al. (2007, 2010). The two examples of the best-fitting flares are shown in Figure 1. From this figure, we can see that the flares of GRB 060111A and GRB 080320 are well fitted. The fitting parameters of flares, such as the start time, peak time, end time, peak flux, fluence, peak luminosity and isotropic energy, are shown in Table 1.

Table 1 consists of 468 bright X-ray flares, including 200 flares with redshifts. The time parameters of flares are derived as follows. The rise time can be obtained by , the decay time and the duration time , where , and are the start time, peak time and end time of flares, respectively. The and are derived from fitting temporal power-law curves to the rise and decay portions of the flares. The points on the light curve where these power laws intersect the underlying decay curve power law are defined as and . The definition is the same as Falcone et al. (2007). However, similar as the definition of duration of prompt emission, the time interval during which the integrated counts of a burst go from 5% to 95% of the total integrated counts is more reasonable. The waiting time is defined as , where is the observed start time of the flare, and is the observed start time of the flare. All the flare properties should be transferred into the source frame if they have redshift measurements in the following analysis. For the first flare appearing in X-ray afterglow, the rest-frame waiting time is taken as . In the case of multiple flares, some flares may occur during the activity of other flares. The waiting time can also defined as above, because the start times of these flares are different. This definition of waiting time is widely used in geophysics (e.g., Omori 1895), magnetospheric physics (e.g., Chapman et al. 1998), solar physics (e.g., Crosby 1996; Wheatland et al. 1998;), and astrophysics (e.g., Negoro et al. 1995; Wang & Dai 2013). An extensive review on waiting time can be found in chapter 5 of Aschwanden (2011). The isotropic energy of flare in the 0.3-10 keV band can be obtain by , where is the redsihft, is the luminosity distance, and is the fluence of flare. The flare fluence is calculated by integrating the corresponding fitting smooth broken power law function (equation (1)) from the start time to the end time of the flare in the 0.2-10 keV energy band. The underlying continuum has been subtracted. The peak luminosity and mean luminosity can be derived through and , where is the peak flux of flare.

3 Parameters of X-ray Flares and Their Correlations

Figure 2 shows the histogram distributions of the flare parameters. The peak times of flares range from between 100 s and s after GRB trigger, mainly from 100 s to 1000 s, at the early time of afterglow phase. While according to Liang et al. (2010) and Yi et al. (2013), the peak time of the optical onset bump is also in the range of 100 - 1000 s statistically. Therefore the peak times of flares are nearly matching the peak times of optical afterglow onset bumps. The distributions of rise times and decay times are more symmetric. Both of them are in the range 10 to s. The isotropic energy of the X-ray flare with redshift can be estimated from the fluence. The energy of flares mainly distributed from erg to erg, about less than two orders of magnitude compared with GRBs prompt emission. If the Gaussian function is used to fit the 0.3-10 keV isotropic energy of X-ray flares, the peak of the distribution is erg. Although the distribution is quite skewed and the peak of the fitting does not coincide with the peak of the energy distribution. The peak luminosity of X-ray flares mainly range from erg to erg , generally two or three orders of magnitude larger than the peak luminosity of the optical afterglow bumps. In the next paragraph, we will discuss the possible correlations among those parameters of X-ray flares.

Figure 3 demonstrates the existence of a strong correlation between the rise and decay times (the left one), i.e., , with the slope index 0.93. Generally, the decay time is longer than the rise time, which is the general property of shocks. There is also a strong correlation between the flare duration time and the peak time. The duration times of X-ray flares range from 10 s to s, and mainly distribute between 100 s and 1000 s. These two tight correlations suggest that longer rise times associate with longer decay times, and also indicate broader flares peak at later times.

We show some correlations among the characteristics of the X-ray flares in the following figures. The correlations and linear correlation coefficients from the Spearman pair correlation analysis are shown in Table 2. Figure 4 shows correlations between the peak luminosity and the flare time scales. These correlations clearly demonstrate that a dimmer pulse of X-ray flare tends to peak at a later time with a longer duration time. The correlation between peak luminosity and the isotropic energy (the mean luminosity) indicates that a flare with larger () tends to have a brighter X-ray flare peaking at earlier time.

Figure 5 shows correlations between the mean luminosity and the timescales of flares, which are transferred into the rest frame. We obtain the mean luminosity thought the isotropic energy divided by duration, i.e., . We find that the mean luminosity is also tightly anti-correlated with the time-scales of X-ray flares. These correlations between mean luminosity and the timescales indicate that a dimmer X-ray flare peaking at a later time also with a longer duration time. Figure 6 shows the correlations between the waiting time and other parameters of flares. The waiting time is correlated with both the peak time and the duration time, which means a longer waiting time tends to peak at a later time with a longer duration time. Besides, the waiting time is anti-correlated with both the peak luminosity and the mean luminosity. From above discussions, we conclude that these correlations are consistent with each other.

4 The Frequency Distributions of Flare Parameters

The erratic X-ray flares generally supposed to be produced by the late activities of central engine, therefore X-ray flares may share a similar physical mechanism as GRB prompt emission. A lot of work has been done to investigate their physical origin. Wang & Dai (2013) studied the distributions of the energies, duration times and waiting times of solar flares and GRB X-ray flares. They found both of them have similar statistical distributions. Apart from GRBs, Wang et al. (2015) discovered that X-ray flares from the black hole systems share the similar statistical properties with solar flares, including Swift J1644+57, M87 and Sgr A. Solar flares are driven magnetic reconnection (Lu & Hamilton 1991; Charbonneau et al. 2001; Morales & Charbonneau 2008; Aschwanden 2012). The power-law distributions of X-ray flare parameters indicate that they may be self-organized criticality (SOC) events (Bak et al. 1987, 1988) driven by magnetic reconnection. This suggests that GRB jet contains a significant fraction of Poynting flux. The ratio between the Poynting flux and baryonic flux is larger than unity, i.e., (Zhang & Yan 2011). Meanwhile the GRB prompt emission is likely powered by dissipation of magnetic field energy (Lei et al. 2013; Yi et al. 2015b; Jia et al. 2015). Recently, Uhm & Zhang (2015) also studied the steep decay phase after the peak time of X-ray flare and found the decay slope is steeper than the standard value , where and are the decay slope of light curve and the observed spectral index, respectively. This standard value can be understood as follows. For a conical jet of GRB with an opening angle , emission from the same radius but from different viewing latitudes would reach the observer at different times, which is called curvature effect. If the emission area keeps a constant Lorentz factor , there exists a simple relation (i.e., Kumar & Panaitescu 2000). In the same situation, the flare decay properties demand that the emission region is undergoing significant bulk acceleration. In the following, we will study the distributions of flare parameters using a large sample.

We present the differential distributions of solar hard X-ray flares in Figure 7. Because the number of solar flares is very large, we select 11595 solar flares observed by RHESSI (Aschwanden 2011). We consider distribution of energy, waiting time, duration time and peak flux. The number of flares with energy between and can be expressed by

(3)

where is the power-law index and is the cutoff energy. With this equation, we obtain the cumulative energy distribution

(4)

where and are two fitting parameters. The power-law slope is for the differential distribution of solar flares (Aschwanden 2011). For the other three parameters of solar flares, their differential distribution can be expressed as , where is corresponding to a parameter of solar flares. All distributions show power-law behavior. The indices of the waiting time, duration time and peak flux are , and , respectively (Aschwanden 2011). These distributions support that solar flares are SOC events driven by a magnetic reconnection process occurring in the atmosphere of the Sun. Therefore, the distributions of solar flares could be well understood within a physical framework, i.e., SOC.

We consider two groups of X-ray flares. In the first case, we consider all 468 X-ray flares. Since some of them have no detected redshift, we don’t make any correction of the their time parameters. To get the differential distributions of these varieties, we separate them into 20 bins in the equal logarithmic space and then use power-law function to fit them. We apply the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique to obtain the best fitting parameters and give the confidential region. Besides, we also consider the cumulative distribution of the peak flux of X-ray flares in this case. We also use the fit function and the MCMC method to obtain the optimal parameter and give the confidential region. The fitting result of the distribution of these time parameters are shown in Figure 8. In the second case, we only consider those X-ray flares with detected redshifts, which makes our sample only include 200 X-ray flares. In this case, we transfer the time parameters into the rest frame with . Moreover, because all of the X-ray flares in this sub-sample have detected redshifts, we can calculate the isotropic energy through . The energy distributions GRB X-ray flares show a flat part at the low energy regime, which could be due to incomplete sampling and some selection bias for large energy flares (Cliver et al. 2012). Therefore, in order to avoid this selection effect, we only select the distribution above the break to be fitted. Then, just same as the total sample, we use MCMC method to obtain the optimal fit parameters and the confidential regions for the distributions. The results are shown in Figure 9.

From Figure 8 and Figure 9, we find that the differential distributions of the time parameters, can be well fitted with the power-law function both for the total sample and the sub-sample with detected redshifts. In Figure 8, the power-law indices of the peak times, rise times, decay times, waiting times and duration times for the total sample are , , , , and , respectively. While in Figure 9, the power-law indices of the peak times, rise times, decay times, waiting times and duration times for the sub-sample with redshifts are , , , , and , respectively. There are a little differences between the best-fitting parameters in the two cases. For the cumulative distribution of peak flux and isotropic energy of X-ray flares, we also obtain the power-law slopes. For the total sample, we get the optimal parameter for peak flux cumulative distribution. Meanwhile, for the sub-sample, we get the optimal parameter for isotropic energy cumulative distribution. These power-law distributions are natural predications of SOC theory (Aschwanden 2011).

Figure 10 shows the power-law distributions of solar flares and GRB X-ray flares. Although the energies of GRB X-ray flares are in the range from erg to erg, and erg to erg for solar flare energies, they show power-law distributions with different indices. These distributions can be understood in fractal-diffusive avalanche model (Aschwanden 2012). The magnetic reconnection as physical origin of solar flares is well recognized (Sweet 1958; Parker 1957; for a recent review, see Shibata & Magara 2011). For solar flares, the total magnetic energy released during a reconnection process in an elementary volume with an average magnetic energy density is (Shibata & Magara 2011)

(5)

which is the typical energy of solar flare. For models of GRB X-ray flares, there are several magnetic reconnection models. Dai et al. (2006) proposed that X-ray flares could be produced by differentially rotating, millisecond pulsars. The differential rotation leads to windup of interior poloidal magnetic fields and the toroidal fields break through the stellar surface. The energy from reconnection toroidal fields with different polarity is (Dai et al. 2006; Kluzniak & Ruderman 1998)

(6)

where and are the toroid’s volume and the stellar volume, respectively. This energy is comparable to the observed one. X-ray flares of GRBs may also be powered by magnetic dissipation in a decelerating shell (Giannios 2006). The analysis by Giannios (2006) shows that the energy emitted in a single flare and produced by a single reconnection event is

(7)

where is the isotropic energy of the forward shock, and the fraction of the Alfvén speed of the magnetic reconnection in a strongly magnetized plasma. For a constant-density medium, the typical value of is four (Waxman 1997). In stellar wind case, the value of is two (Pe’er & Waxman 2005). So the energy budgets of these models are comparable to the observed energies of X-ray flares.

5 Conclusions and Discussion

In this paper, we present a catalog of 468 bright X-ray flares of GRBs taken from the online Swift/XRT GRB Catalogue until March 2015, including 200 flares with redshifts. We use a smooth broken power-law function to fit the X-ray flares, and obtain the fitting parameters of X-ray flares, which are listed in Table 1. The peak times of flares range from between 100 s and s after GRB trigger, mainly from 100 s to 1000 s. The duration times of flares also mainly distribute between 100 s and 1000 s. The 0.3-10 keV isotropic energy of X-ray flares mainly distributed from erg to erg, which is about less than two or three orders of magnitude compared with GRBs prompt emission. The 0.3-10 keV isotropic energy of X-ray flares distribution is a lognormal peaked at erg. We also found some tight correlations between these parameters of X-ray flares, and the best-fitting results for the correlations are shown in Table 2. Generally, these correlations clearly demonstrate that a dimmer pulse of X-ray flare tends to peak at a later time with a longer duration time.

We also study the frequency distributions of solar flares and GRB X-ray flares. In the analysis, we combine all X-ray flares from long and short GRBs. Some studies indicated that X-ray flares in long and short GRBs may have a common origin (Margutti et al. 2011; Wang & Dai 2013). The best-fitting results for the power-law distributions of these parameters are shown in Figures 7, 8, and 9. We find there are four power-law distributions with different indices between X-ray flares and solar flares, including power-law distributions of energies, durations, peak fluxes and waiting times. These distributions could be explained by a fractal-diffusive, self-organized criticality model. Besides, we also investigate the peak times, rising times and decay times of X-ray flares, and find all of them show power-law distributions.

Interestingly, the ratio is almost constant with time in our X-ray flare sample (see right panel of Fig. 3). This result is also found by Chincarini et al. (2010). The late internal shock model can not account for this result since the arrival time is not related to the collision conditions (Kobayashi et al. 1997; Ramirez-Ruiz & Fenimore 2000). Further more, the efficiency of internal collision is typically low (Panaitescu et al. 1999; Kumar 1999; Fan & Wei 2005).

X-ray flares may also be powered by magnetic dissipation in a decelerating shell (Giannios 2006). MHD instability could be triggered in strongly magnetized ejecta during its deceleration due to interaction with the external medium. This instability can release energy through magnetic reconnection. Multiple flares are expected because of dissipation in multiple neighboring regions in the decelerating flow. This model also predicts that smooth flares are more energetic than spiky ones (Giannios 2006). Chincarini et al. (2010) compared this model with X-ray flare data, and found this model is not in contradiction with observation. However more test are needed. Another possible model for X-ray flares is the internal-collision-induced magnetic reconnection and turbulence model, which can also reproduce the properties of GRB prompt emission (Zhang & Yan 2011). In this model, internal collisions distort the ordered magnetic field lines in the ejecta. The X-ray flares can be triggered by magnetic reconnection in the distorted magnetic field. So these two models are favored from our analysis. However, much more data are required to constrain the model parameters.

Acknowledgments

We thank an anonymous referee for useful suggestions and comments. We many thank Zi-Gao Dai and Bing Zhang for valuable comments. This work is supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, grant No. 2014CB845800) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grants 11422325, 11373022, 11533003 and 11163001), the Excellent Youth Foundation of Jiangsu Province (BK20140016).

Figure 1: Best fitting for the X-ray flares of GRB 060111A and GRB 080320. The blue-dash lines show the best fitting for individual flares, and the green line shows the underlying continuum. The red line shows the total best fitting. Inset: the detail of flare fittings.
Figure 2: The histogram distributions of X-ray flare parameters. For the observed time parameters, the black line is corresponding to the fitting results of all the flare sample. While the red line represent the flares with reshifts, and the parameters have been transferred to the source frame. The mean value is 24.64 for . The blue line shows the best lognormal fit of energy.
Figure 3: The correlations of time-scales of GRB X-ray flares. Left panel: the rise time is correlated with the decay time. Right panel: the duration is correlated with peak time. The red line is the best fitting. The best fitting results are shown in Table 2.
Figure 4: The correlations between peak luminosity and other parameters of GRB X-ray flares. The red line is the best fitting. The times are transferred into the source frame. The best fitting results are listed in Table 2.
Figure 5: The correlations between mean luminosity and time scales of GRB X-ray flares. Red lines are the best fittings. The best fitting results can be seen in Table 2.
Figure 6: The correlations between waiting time and other parameters of GRB X-ray flares. The symbols have the same meanings as in Figure 4. The best fitting results can be seen in Table 2.
Figure 7: The cumulative distributions of solar hard X-ray flares. 11595 solar flares from RHESSI during 2002-2007 are shown as black dots (Aschwanden 2011). The best-fit for the power-law distributions of waiting time, duration time, energy and peak flux are , , , and , respectively.
Figure 8: The distributions of GRB X-ray flares. The best-fit indices for the differential distributions of peak time, rise time, decay time, waiting time and duration time of X-ray flares are , , , and respectively. The gray region shows the 95% confidence level. The optimal parameter of the cumulative distribution for X-ray flare peak flux is .
Figure 9: The distributions of GRB X-ray flares with redshift. 200 GRB flares are used. The observed times of the flares are transferred into the source frame. The best-fit indices for the frequency distributions of peak time, rise time, decay time, waiting time and duration time of X-ray flares are , , , and respectively. The gray region shows the 95% confidence level. The optimal parameter for the cumulative distribution of isotropic energy of X-ray flares is .
Figure 10: The comparison between solar flares (blue stars) and GRB X-ray flares (black dots). In the up two panels, the distributions are differential distribution and cumulative distribution for solar flares and GRB X-ray flares, respectively. The best-fitting indices can be found in Figures 7, 8 and 9.
GRB
(s) (s) (s) (erg cm s) (erg cm) (erg s) (erg)
050406 2.44 55.8 15.0 218.1 7.3 457.6 24.7 1.19 0.11 1.31 0.13 1.58 0.15 1.74 0.17
050502B 414.2 7.4 713.7 5.3 1352.2 22.2 33.31 0.46 80.86 1.15
050502B 32171.8 8920.4 76347.6 3768.3 128229.1 7230.3 0.01 0.00 5.64 1.06
050607 267.1 6.1 309.7 2.5 562.5 15.1 12.37 0.95 7.61 0.65
050712 212.2 5.0 216.6 3.4 221.5 3.5 2.82 0.90 0.23 0.29
050712 245.4 11.1 265.3 4.6 276.3 6.2 4.12 0.71 0.98 0.59
050712 468.7 9256.0 475.6 274.0 617.0 317.0 3.87 26.12 1.65 13.70
050712 797.1 142.3 963.5 74.9 1518.1 314.3 0.49 0.13 1.63 0.71
050713A 100.7 0.7 109.2 0.3 190.0 1.7 93.67 3.38 18.92 0.82
050713A 158.3 2.2 167.6 0.9 233.4 5.4 12.50 0.85 3.51 0.35
050714B 280.4 17.3 382.9 7.7 764.7 38.8 2.16 0.25 2.23 0.28
050716 27.6 162.8 112.4 35.4 466.0 82.1 24.69 8.23 36.27 15.79
050716 161.9 1.8 165.5 0.8 450.4 184.8 12.53 1.57 9.47 2.45
050716 346.1 11.0 380.5 5.3 489.0 19.2 3.77 0.40 2.71 0.51
050724 0.257 236.3 13.4 265.4 3.8 467.0 4.8 6.81 0.59 4.39 0.88 0.11 0.01 0.07 0.01
050724 0.257 17195.3 4601.0 55578.9 3054.4 220871.8 12473.6 0.02 0.00 8.95 0.93 2.97E-4 2.73E-5 0.14 0.01
050726 156.9 17.0 162.6 6.2 183.5 16.3 1.82 1.37 0.20 0.20
050726 251.6 5.3 266.0 4.5 293.2 7.0 2.83 0.29 0.95 0.35
050730 3.97 224.7 4.2 233.7 2.9 247.4 4.2 8.04 0.86 1.49 0.66 23.78 2.55 4.42 1.94
050730 3.97 378.2 7.1 433.9 3.3 506.9 8.5 11.70 0.51 9.71 1.11 34.58 1.51 28.70 3.27
050730 3.97 660.9 5.8 682.6 4.9 736.8 11.3 5.85 0.49 3.55 1.03 17.30 1.45 10.50 3.04
050803 0.422 348.5 152.4 741.3 44.7 953.3 96.4 1.56 0.27 6.08 2.27 0.07 0.01 0.27 0.10
050803 0.422 873.8 179.2 1144.8 54.9 7571.7 765.4 1.05 0.13 20.41 3.93 0.05 0.01 0.89 0.17
050803 0.422 5860.2 968.5 11659.6 755.3 117317.9 1485.8 0.33 0.02 57.08 5.41 0.01 9.93E-4 2.50 0.24
050803 0.422 765783.8 25387.5 806459.5 1199.3 1.8E6 509312.6 6.38E-4 3.88E-4 3.07 3.10 2.8E-5 1.7E-5 0.14 0.14
050820A 2.612 217.2 0.7 231.5 0.3 2631.9 1154.3 169.48 5.21 323.21 19.95 252.69 7.77 482.00 29.70
050822 212.3 7.9 235.7 3.8 482.2 8.1 4.90 0.45 2.95 0.41
050822 315.1 11.6 447.6 2.5 949.6 24.1 11.49 0.41 12.89 0.48
050904 6.1 389.0 13.2 465.5 5.4 515.7 7.6 10.05 0.76 8.75 1.65 57.04 4.31 49.70 9.35
050904 6.1 5335.1 199.8 6772.2 111.4 11419.2 1209.2 0.75 0.10 10.67 1.47 4.25 0.54 60.60 8.35
050904 6.1 10487.7 630.6 14206.7 264.1 149183.3 9765.1 0.57 0.09 34.83 5.97 3.23 0.52 198.00 33.90
050904 6.1 17775.0 9180.9 32882.6 1050.8 68190.1 6920.3 0.11 0.03 11.01 3.12 0.61 0.17 62.50 17.70
050908 3.35 382.8 8.3E6 390.2 2.9E6 683.8 4.4E6 1.98 75666.73 1.49 72460.91 4.46 170550.38 3.36 163000.00
050915A 2.5273 53.6 32.3 111.9 3.5 140.0 6.5 3.85 0.55 1.96 0.59 5.42 0.77 2.76 0.84
050915A 2.5273 497.7 21.7 529.6 0 560.1 25.9 0.28 0.10 0.14 0.14 0.39 0.14 0.20 0.20
050916 483.4 2554.7 934.2 1907.5 7015.6 14872.3 0.14 0.30 2.72 9.70
050916 16767.3 264.4 19310.3 191.9 30612.3 1861.9 0.38 0.09 10.63 2.76
050922B 222.7 32.1 372.6 3.0 1510.7 177.7 13.85 0.46 18.15 0.64
050922B 480.8 9.7 499.4 1.9 641.0 48.2 3.55 0.64 0.98 0.20
050922B 382.4 25.5 819.4 6.9 1805.8 78.5 22.31 1.51 44.45 3.01
051117A 23.7 21.2 136.6 7.8 574.7 50.7 58.02 4.77 98.78 10.22
051117A 242.7 34.8 357.2 17.1 719.1 387.1 16.48 2.64 33.54 11.05
051117A 403.6 17.3 439.9 5.0 721.2 290.0 9.82 4.13 15.06 12.22
051117A 584.7 7.6 604.7 4.7 680.9 23.4 5.75 0.68 3.49 1.09
051117A 827.8 19.5 945.2 9.2 1145.3 99.1 9.60 1.23 15.77 3.80
051117A 969.5 53.7 1107.6 7.7 1223.5 30.8 9.10 1.58 12.38 3.54
051117A 1252.0 5.0 1318.0 1.7 2224.0 71.7 21.08 0.57 66.99 3.29
060111A 23.7 9.8 99.2 2.3 193.4 9.8 24.85 1.44 16.98 1.39
060111A 113.8 11.4 167.8 2.1 252.1 9.9 14.29 0.77 6.60 0.48
060111A 180.5 3.3 283.8 0.9 752.0 7.6 50.68 0.74 48.27 0.74
060115 3.53 354.5 22.1 402.6 13.1 559.7 21.9 1.71 0.29 1.71 0.48 4.20 0.72 4.20 1.18
060124 2.3 318.7 6.2 376.5 3.3 958.9 128.2 11.76 0.84 24.33 3.18 14.09 1.01 29.20 3.81
060124 2.3 322.3 4.9 573.5 0.7 711.6 0.9 274.78 7.05 239.85 6.49 329.26 8.45 287.00 7.78
060124 2.3 611.2 2.6 698.7 0.8 958.9 6.8 211.62 4.97 143.36 3.55 253.57 5.95 172.00 4.25
060124 2.3 961.7 238.7 1005.3 249.3 1959.1 157424.4 21.75 331.20 55.66 1069.84 26.06 396.86 66.70 1280.00
060204B 81.4 5.0 119.2 0.7 163.7 2.2 55.09 2.28 15.48 0.81
060204B 296.8 3.4 318.6 1.3 398.6 6.2 10.04 0.54 4.01 0.31
060210 3.91 171.6 2.2 198.7 1.0 260.8 3.0 35.38 1.11 14.94 0.80 102.13 3.21 43.10 2.30
060210 3.91 352.8 2.1 372.2 1.2 471.7 6.5 16.51 0.67 8.97 0.63 47.66 1.94 25.90 1.80
060223A 4.41 1165.4 457605.9 1248.0 304569.7 3114.4 759035.4 0.32 170.05 2.15 1737.24 1.12 592.52 7.50 6050.00
060312 69.3 6.5 79.8 2.6 344.2 21.8 9.28 2.56 3.48 1.19
060312 82.2 4.4 98.3 1.2 155.4 11.6 22.03 2.90 3.29 0.47
060312 103.4 1.4 109.6 0.2 204.0 11.8 36.98 2.90 4.76 0.43
060312 130.7 20.4 145.8 4.3 285.5 138.5 1.57 0.59 0.59 0.27
060312 398.6 63.5 562.0 30.1 910.4 223.3 0.32 0.06 0.69 0.21
060413 501.5 58.4 675.1 28.5 1278.8 107.6 4.78 0.67 11.27 2.05
060413 631.7 1517.1 2955.4 792.6 5689.4 1544.0 1.24 0.91 35.68 33.00
060413 1350.6 464.3 18836.6 721.1 50386.6 2435.0 0.30 0.02 78.09 78.09
060418 1.49 123.6 0.6 129.3 0.3 167.2 1.0 218.49 8.16 36.77 1.92 119.58 4.47 20.10 1.05
060510B 4.9 225.1 13.6 305.1 2.5 786.1 3.5 47.35 1.65 50.72 4.22 193.90 6.75 208.00 17.30
060510B 4.9 507.2 6628.5 1244.7 16266.6 4277.1 73749.4 3.46 250.01 20.23 1469.79 14.16 1023.81 82.80 6020.00
060512 0.4428 187.1 7.0 206.5 4.2 265.7 11.7 4.55 0.76 1.84 0.49 0.22 0.04 0.09 0.02
060522 5.11 112.4 85.3 167.1 7.8 195.0 9.6 2.02 0.48 1.22 1.01 8.79 2.09 5.32 4.42
060526 3.21 224.9 1.2 251.6 0.4 408.0 17.1 198.75 7.93 56.78 2.47 417.86 16.67 119.00 5.20
060526 3.21 239.8 11.3 309.1 1.2 549.6 5.2 78.96 4.09 44.89 2.43 166.02 8.60 94.40 5.12
060526 3.21 4498.3 3353.3 8507.2 2967.6 24543.5 8402.2 0.04 0.01 3.67 1.83 0.08 0.02 7.71 3.85
060602B 38.1 53.2 182.0 35.2 736.6 268.3 1.84 0.38 4.94 1.54
060602B 2342.3 109005.8 13332.3 465705.3 29890.0 2.9E6 0.02 0.32 2.75 45.96
060602B 35910.0 2E8 622048.1 2.5E9 1.3E7 5.1E10 0.00 3.39 49.59 233536.06
060604 2.1357 82.0 3.7 137.6 0.8 369.4 12.6 41.47 1.15 19.12 0.56 43.65 1.21 20.10 0.59
060604 2.1357 159.6 1.9 169.9 0.4 239.1 7.5 30.56 1.87 4.49 0.31 32.16 1.97 4.73 0.33
060607A 3.082 41.1 24.7 83.7 0.7 90.6 0.7 20.48 2.58 6.12 1.89 40.28 5.08 12.00 3.72
060607A 3.082 89.2 1.1 97.9 0.5 151.3 5.4 47.29 2.19 10.66 0.79 92.99 4.31 21.00 1.56
060607A 3.082 163.3 8.2 180.4 4.7 197.5 9.0 6.85 0.85 1.83 0.91 13.46 1.68 3.59 1.79
060607A 3.082 205.0 4.4 260.0 1.3 367.8 6.1 38.02 0.94 24.56 0.96 74.76 1.84 48.30 1.88
060707 3.43 620.4 372.2 828.2 143.5 1320.8 220.6 0.15 0.08 0.67 0.76 0.35 0.18 1.56 1.79
060707 3.43 1339.2 380.1 1391.6 2.5 13951.9 5977.2 0.16 0.08 5.11 4.37 0.37 0.18 12.00 10.20
060714 2.71 75.6 22.1 113.8 3.4 161.2 51.0 37.97 5.69 9.40 1.60 60.26 9.03 14.90 2.53
060714 2.71 109.3 15.5 131.2 1.1 148.3 1.2 37.27 13.10 4.18 1.55 59.14 20.78 6.63 2.45
060714 2.71 123.6 6.4 140.0 0.7 203.9 11.3 52.03 7.34 9.62 1.50 82.56 11.65 15.30 2.38
060714 2.71 152.0 3.1 175.2 0.6 235.7 3.4 44.02 1.99 9.11 0.46 69.86 3.15 14.50 0.72
060719 1.532 178.1 10.6 203.6 7.2 266.6 21.2 1.40 0.30 0.59 0.19 0.81 0.17 0.34 0.11
060804 513.3 26.7 515.6 24.7 519.5 26.4 0.59 0.16 0.04 0.46
060904A 258.6 7.0 313.5 3.5 487.8 8.2 6.27 0.36 5.25 0.43
060904A 645.0 9.7 679.1 4.5 928.1 41.5 1.72 0.16 1.93 0.29
060904B 0.703 130.0 0.8 172.7 0.7 399.7 7.3 214.67 3.16 126.94 7.83 26.90 0.40 15.90 0.98
060926 3.208 253.7 62.5 443.3 26.1 3591.1 360.6 0.29 0.03 2.76 0.44 0.60 0.06 5.80 0.93
060929 352.9 5.4 527.3 1.3 1261.8 17.4 27.06 0.56 31.11 0.66
061121 1.314 71.5 0.6 74.3 0.4 79.4 0.7 848.92 62.72 45.61 8.44 366.45 27.08 19.70 3.65
061202 90.2 8.3 140.9 1.2 363.6 18.7 48.78 1.83 21.84 0.88
061202 211.0 19.2 251.0 4.6 591.7 60.5 3.52 0.40 3.90 0.61
061202 246654.3 4824.8 255026.7 284.7 726419.8 23583.9 0.00 6.59E-4 2.45 1.32
070103 2.6208 606.1 103.4 797.9 17.6 830.8 18.2 0.23 0.09 0.37 0.32 0.35 0.13 0.56 0.48
070107 311.4 2.3 321.8 1.0 347.0 1.0 15.71 1.94 2.57 0.40
070107 321.1 8.7 357.7 2.4 488.8 19.7 16.84 1.00 11.31 1.16
070107 343.4 25.6 447.2 5.9 490.1 11.1 6.15 1.00 5.63 1.71
070107 1311.6 39.7 1348.2 36.5 1442.8 51.4 0.90 0.22 0.97 0.85
070107 83986.3 4443.3 85339.9 4524.4 96526.4 5350.4 0.01 0.00 1.09 1.34
070129 2.3384 187.5 69.1 210.2 5.2 226.9 12.9 8.71 6.27 2.49 5.28 10.74 7.74 3.07 6.51
070129 2.3384 217.1 41.5 239.8 7.2 631.8 117.8 10.80 7.38 7.37 5.84 13.32 9.11 9.08 7.20
070129 2.3384 253.3 9.4 304.7 2.3 536.9 57.2 76.30 7.04 34.00 3.29 94.09 8.68 41.90 4.06
070129 2.3384 261.2 25.9 365.9 1.7 467.6 9.7 105.71 7.53 45.97 3.52 130.35 9.28 56.70 4.34
070129 2.3384 349.9 15.2 445.6 2.6 810.1 61.9 39.33 2.34 27.97 1.73 48.50 2.88 34.50 2.13
070129 2.3384 368.8 75.3 573.5 8.9 1085.5 101.4 14.27 1.37 20.00 2.02 17.60 1.70 24.70 2.49
070129 2.3384 623.2 20.0 660.6 3.7 924.9 96.6 6.53 0.88 3.73 0.58 8.05 1.09 4.60 0.71
070129 2.3384 865.6 4327.9 885.9 0.9 1198.9 196.5 0.36 0.20 0.45 0.36 0.45 0.25 0.56 0.45
070318 0.836 237.7 6.1 280.7 4.2 429.7 9.2 7.78 0.40 8.21 0.80 1.38 0.07 1.46 0.14
070330 172.3 9.1 215.9 4.2 321.3 16.3 3.37 0.44 1.92 0.32
070419B 188.5 7.5 233.1 2.5 440.0 6.9 59.61 2.68 64.22 5.23
070518 71.7 26.0 86.4 1.8 92.2 1.8 3.63 1.47 0.54 0.64
070518 91.9 3.7 104.8 1.2 251.3 18.8 10.07 1.14 3.67 0.52
070518 135.9 5.0 142.0 2.7 166.7 19.1 2.85 0.89 0.41 0.21
070518 148.6 9.1 187.8 1.9 281.8 8.4 8.93 0.58 3.44 0.27
070520B 139.4 4.0 195.5 1.2 857.9 4.2 27.08 0.64 21.85 0.62
070616 137.4 9.0 148.8 5.0 178.1 15.8 42.62 9.80 11.59 6.83
070616 192.6 5.2 198.5 3.3 205.7 5.9 23.24 5.89 2.35 1.92
070616 186.5 54.5 265.7 18.1 435.2 99.7 36.65 23.53 45.45 40.53
070616 228.6 123.3 400.3 15.8 676.2 65.8 57.56 11.79 101.05 28.60
070616 452.6 8.1 488.9 2.0 682.9 40.3 68.16 7.74 44.50 6.27
070616 538.5 3.9 548.6 0.5 828.6 61.6 29.69 3.75 25.37 4.69
070616 704.9 14.4 754.8 5.7 855.4 29.5 11.34 1.18 7.91 1.42
070616 896.1 1932.0 1101.2 445.2 1325.8 782.9 1.51 1.54 5.49 20.48
070704 250.9 2.7 313.4 1.0 1446.4 11.5 61.67 1.34 58.74 1.38
070704 538.6 139.8 671.9 40.5 13501.8 1040.2 1.53 0.25 12.32 2.41
070714A 10.3 26.2 303.4 54.7 719.3 573.2 0.14 0.05 0.51 0.25
070714A 247.5 460.3 869.8 185.5 15491.5 6455.1 0.07 0.02 2.69 1.48
070721B 3.626 232.9 12.1 311.5 0.9 330.2 0.9 16.63 1.49 6.62 0.84 42.59 3.81 17.00 2.15
070721B 3.626 327.1 4.7 346.7 2.1 398.8 13.8 8.66 0.81 2.72 0.43 22.18 2.07 6.97 1.09
070721B 3.626 422.0 127.7 507.4 97.7 592.8 345.6 2.21 0.87 2.58 2.59 5.67 2.23 6.60 6.64
070721B 3.626 597.0 55064.5 610.5 54072.9 930.2 70698.7 1.97 461.80 3.58 1655.92 5.05 1182.58 9.17 4240.00
070724A 0.457 22.1 19.1 109.0 2.2 136.7 4.4 8.78 0.88 5.54 0.89 0.45 0.05 0.29 0.05
071021 2.452 164.0 13.4 216.2 2.1 319.7 3.2 22.39 1.07 13.74 1.75 29.97 1.43 18.40 2.34
071021 2.452 5637.5 137.5 6328.6 62.0 8202.1 174.3 0.35 0.03 3.30 0.39 0.46 0.04 4.42 0.52
071031 2.692 2.8 3.5 158.0 1.5 203.8 9.8 47.26 1.77 59.39 3.11 74.16 2.77 93.20 4.89
071031 2.692 147.9 16.4 200.9 1.7 616.7 106.3 29.31 3.88 16.29 2.30 45.99 6.08 25.60 3.61
071031 2.692 213.0 13.6 258.3 1.8 544.8 53.5 13.61 1.47 6.97 0.82 21.36 2.31 10.90 1.29
071031 2.692 247.9 18.1 448.8 3.9 2985.7 105.1 9.56 0.28 24.30 0.76 15.01 0.44 38.10 1.20
071112C 0.823 579.7 37.6 657.9 32.6 974.9 46.2 1.58 0.21 4.15 1.30 0.27 0.04 0.72 0.22
071118 201.0 8.8 209.6 3.2 323.7 70.3 2.20 0.48 1.02 0.39
071118 375.1 20.2 401.0 14.2 442.1 31.5 2.01 0.54 0.98 0.72
071118 482.2 36.3 599.7 12.7 913.4 41.0 4.06 0.35 7.71 1.08
071122 1.14 400.3 968554.2 405.2 727056.5 454.6 789589.7 1.30 24263.35 0.41 12229.72 0.43 7968.72 0.13 4020.00
080210 2.641 166.6 3.3 191.6 1.3 255.1 7.4 20.77 1.58 6.00 0.55 31.56 2.40 9.11 0.84
080212 177.7 2.9 191.5 2.1 325.9 27.1 10.94 1.00 4.10 0.51
080212 195.2 6.8 240.0 1.4 591.9 34.5 38.78 2.76 24.86 1.96
080212 218.0 9.8 296.2 1.5 573.7 19.5 34.77 2.08 23.94 1.52
080229A 58.2 7.1 107.7 1.2 221.6 13.1 62.56 1.95 27.90 1.13
080229A 299.5 56.6 377.0 38.1 706.7 367.3 4.46 0.90 13.06 13.11
080310 2.4266 132.6 3.5 147.3 1.1 1772.9 168.2 21.85 2.51 21.98 3.02 28.72 3.29 28.90 3.97
080310 2.4266 173.2 6.4 191.3 1.3 1423.4 523.5 24.36 3.44 21.70 3.73 32.02 4.52 28.50 4.90
080310 2.4266 129.7 46.3 233.3 4.9 395.7 28.3 20.00 4.71 13.29 3.63 26.29 6.19 17.50 4.77
080310 2.4266 265.4 11.6 280.3 1.8 394.7 88.1 11.86 2.95 2.21 0.61 15.59 3.88 2.90 0.80
080310 2.4266 116.2 42.3 365.6 2.6 621.6 7.7 36.35 1.79 56.56 4.04 47.79 2.35 74.40 5.31
080310 2.4266 340.7 11.2 567.6 1.6 991.2 25.6 32.88 0.90 31.69 0.87 43.23 1.18 41.70 1.15
080310 2.4266 211.9 938.4 6957.2 1024.9 43685.4 8325.0 0.09 0.01 14.26 2.58 0.11 0.01 18.70 3.39
080319A 1312.1 43.6 1331.7 33.0 1350.3 34.6 0.12 0.06 0.04 0.13
080319D 93.4 138.1 188.9 23.8 258.4 91.6 3.59 1.50 2.72 1.44
080319D 229.8 37.2 325.1 11.1 493.8 41.5 6.90 0.87 7.78 1.45
080319D 397.6 162.3 470.9 18.5 696.5 539.6 2.29 0.82 1.42 0.51
080319D 1252.9 13664.3 2115.8 10869.8 10785.5 55847.2 0.10 0.68 2.92 33.26
080320 189.4 5246.3 212.3 97.3 249.7 159.2 2.72 4.52 0.80 1.64
080320 273.5 19.4 309.6 4.2 487.0 23.0 4.26 0.42 3.10 0.42
080320 753.4 9240.5 763.0 851.3 901.5 975.6 0.78 6.94 0.60 8.57
080325 83.4 35.0 167.2 2.3 212.7 14.5 33.55 5.73 13.29 2.56
080325 115.2 17.1 218.5 3.3 499.6 80.1 38.58 4.56 31.12 3.87
080325 109.8 93.5 319.3 6.0 704.1 24.3 12.60 2.32 22.06 4.41
080506 51.9 27.7 174.6 2.0 237.5 3.4 28.75 1.60 30.86 4.00
080506 423.0 9.0 476.3 3.7 619.2 11.7 9.17 0.51 7.93 0.70
080607 3.036 117.3 0.8 124.7 0.4 226.4 1.7 212.57 6.75 62.77 2.61 407.79 12.94 120.00 5.00
080802 80.9 3.1 93.7 1.0 123.1 3.4 15.27 1.25 2.57 0.30
080805 1.505 98.0 2.3 118.0 0.9 411.1 2.8 32.95 0.83 18.94 0.67 18.37 0.46 10.60 0.37
080810 3.35 80.2 2.0 105.3 0.7 133.1 1.7 66.51 2.57 16.82 1.02 149.91 5.79 37.90 2.29
080810 3.35 198.2 1.7 208.5 1.1 247.8 3.5 17.50 1.07 4.83 0.57 39.44 2.42 10.90 1.28
080906 2 148.3 6.5 175.6 2.0 693.4 6.9 14.85 0.95 13.81 1.20 13.92 0.89 12.90 1.13
080906 2 233.6 66.0 614.1 22.7 815.7 324.0 1.55 0.14 4.00 1.00 1.45 0.13 3.75 0.94
080906 2 650.9 144.4 1053.6 49.7 8182.1 598.0 0.95 0.09 20.71 2.84 0.89 0.08 19.40 2.66
080913 6.44 209.1 553.9 415.0 154.7 4949.0 325.8 0.21 0.11 0.84 0.55 1.27 0.65 5.19 3.41
080913 6.44 645.0 4.6E6 2859.5 2E7 15510.0 2E8 0.63 19811.40 9.43 298877.42 3.84 121752.76 57.90 1.84E6
080928 1.692 148.7 3.5 208.6 1.0 349.8 3.8 162.54 4.33 93.31 2.87 112.57 3.00 64.60 1.99
080928 1.692 326.0 2.9 356.4 1.2 406.5 4.2 23.10 0.97 8.58 0.58 16.00 0.67 5.94 0.40
081008 1.9685 279.9 1.9 298.9 0.9 420.1 4.5 24.78 1.01 10.74 0.56 22.57 0.92 9.78 0.51
081028 285.1 7.7 324.4 2.7 3174.3 20.2 53.40 2.72 76.81 5.49
081028 317.8 252.2 544.8 20.7 1337.4 54.4 4.70 1.97 11.52 7.51
081028 582.7 32.9 814.7 4.0 6403.9 1931.2 10.91 0.61 46.02 3.17
081028 4292.7 1030.4 23172.6 821.7 84690.3 4139.3 0.09 0.00 28.87 1.82
081102 920.5 9.8 965.3 4.1 1791.4 47.9 5.70 0.40 9.81 0.83
081210 120.0 1.8 138.2 0.7 183.8 8.0 29.12 1.47 5.90 0.40
081210 155.7 8.4 165.5 1.8 176.7 2.0 4.95 1.25 0.57 0.23
081210 98.8 83.5 212.1 4.1 265.0 8.7 6.41 1.50 6.87 3.36
081210 252.7 43.8 320.0 9.8 383.1 44.3 3.96 1.27 2.99 1.64
081210 362.5 14.2 387.8 4.8 451.0 30.8 3.16 0.89 1.70 0.91
090111 287.5 110.1 480.8 23.8 1384.7 195.3 2.99 0.43 6.51 1.03
090407 1.4485 115.0 2.2 137.4 1.0 191.9 5.0 29.13 1.13 9.10 0.56 15.12 0.59 4.72 0.29
090407 1.4485 179.1 11.0 244.8 4.0 352.8 17.0 10.96 0.47 9.21 0.89 5.69 0.24 4.78 0.46
090407 1.4485 285.1 4.8 304.0 1.7 338.5 7.1 9.04 0.81 2.32 0.36 4.69 0.42 1.20 0.19
090417B 207.6 33.8 510.6 9.9 947.4 37.5 19.72 1.32 73.90 7.51
090417B 1265.2 10.0 1392.1 4.7 2574.7 112.9 16.52 0.60 78.92 5.26
090417B 1465.7 12.5 1541.5 6.7 1771.4 149.3 16.76 1.37 22.04 3.91
090417B 1559.9 46.2 1678.2 5.9 1899.5 42.0 14.87 3.58 23.18 7.21
090423 8 117.6 6.8 165.6 3.9 330.0 29.0 4.51 0.52 2.16 0.27 37.81 4.33 18.10 2.27
090429A 88.5 7.7 99.2 3.1 225.7 8.7 13.77 3.29 3.20 1.27
090429A 94.1 35.4 131.9 2.1 178.5 5.2 8.25 1.37 2.30 0.67
090429A 105.3 12.2 171.4 1.9 514.6 34.5 11.35 0.68 6.01 0.37
090429A 208.7 18.3 256.1 5.7 25353.3 84447.3 3.09 0.92 15.02 6.56
090516 3.9 37.3 28.5 196.5 3.8 491.3 12.9 83.99 4.90 117.92 8.17 241.50 14.10 339.00 23.50
090516 3.9 251.0 1.9 273.2 0.6 355.6 5.1 128.22 5.86 29.83 1.50 368.67 16.86 85.80 4.32
090516 3.9 389.5 0.7 391.9 0.2 459.0 13.9 3.02 0.68 1.23 0.51 8.69 1.97 3.54 1.46
090607 95.3 9.3 118.5 3.6 208.3 39.9 3.53 0.45 1.59 0.36
090621A 208.9 2.1 238.3 0.6 501.8 10.6 197.79 12.55 80.71 5.65
090621A 213.2 8.3 267.8 1.0 348.2 12.0 224.71 10.83 57.17 2.83
090709A 74.9 1.0 85.3 0.5 112.2 1.7 124.92 5.75 21.73 1.56
090709A 220.4 15.0 277.6 5.9 374.9 45.4 8.21 0.87 5.46 0.99
090709A 322.7 17.6 411.6 5.1 2416.1 173.0 10.95 0.70 68.15 7.29
090715B 3 58.0 2.0 76.7 0.7 103.6 2.6 113.07 5.14 21.64 1.49 212.67 9.66 40.70 2.80
090715B 3 99.1 2.7 109.2 1.3 181.1 18.1 26.38 2.73 10.28 2.23 49.62 5.13 19.30 4.19
090715B 3 153.5 1.5 157.7 0.9 169.2 5.7 27.34 4.75 2.19 0.69 51.41 8.94 4.13 1.30
090715B 3 127.4 15.0 179.3 2.7 198.5 7.2 32.96 8.37 12.21 4.59 62.00 15.74 23.00 8.63
090715B 3 180.6 7.8 195.4 1.2 263.0 23.4 39.53 7.41 12.24 3.26 74.35 13.94 23.00 6.13
090715B 3 238.5 2.6 252.2 0.9 285.7 9.5 79.61 8.31 12.00 1.54 149.74 15.63 22.60 2.90
090715B 3 201.5 9.3 284.4 1.0 368.5 3.3 120.11 5.41 60.65 3.15 225.92 10.18 114.00 5.92
090715B 3 433.6 5.8 435.9 5.7 441.3 6.4 1.81 0.48 0.13 0.31 3.40 0.90 0.25 0.58
090727 109.4 10.9 268.5 7.5 921.9 305.8 37.48 2.27 46.99 3.01
090807 173.6 1.2 186.7 0.5 445.4 1.3 49.73 1.18 19.09 0.61
090807 5450.4 179.1 6121.8 83.4 17576.9 2398.1 0.06 0.00 2.52 0.39
090809 2.737 168.3 2.0 181.0 0.9 1145.1 249.8 29.88 2.60 22.78 2.42 48.22 4.20 36.80 3.90
090809 2.737 2635.0 229.6 4771.2 94.7 10993.3 1647.7 0.36 0.02 8.12 0.67 0.58 0.04 13.10 1.08
090809 2.737 6036.3 5002.5 17179.2 2230.1 80566.2 19460.5 0.02 0.00 5.21 1.16 0.03 0.00 8.41 1.87
090812 2.452 105.8 3.3 134.0 1.4 257.5 5.0 40.83 2.00 27.53 2.14 54.65 2.67 36.80 2.87
090812 2.452 241.8 2.2 260.4 1.1 344.9 4.5 19.02 0.69 9.64 0.64 25.46 0.92 12.90 0.86
090831C 155.8 6.6 181.9 3.5 297.3 17.9 2.71 0.36 1.40 0.25
090831C 384.6 28.3 442.1 16.7 560.7 39.3 0.52 0.12 0.51 0.20
090904A 291.2 1.4 304.1 0.6 427.4 1.8 52.12 1.55 21.21 0.89
090904B 153.3 42.7 263.5 15.2 1877.9 136.3 2.63 0.19 13.48 1.50
090929B 92.1 3.5 108.9 2.1 156.5 10.4 20.31 1.43 7.12 1.19
090929B 133.7 2.0 151.5 0.7 434.0 21.3 44.64 2.12 31.85 2.09
091026 152.3 8.4 174.7 3.2 567.3 12.4 5.52 0.67 4.55 0.72
091026 254.5 13.6 334.7 3.1 640.2 70.3 8.98 0.46 9.00 0.71
091026 608.9 39.3 775.3 18.5 4148.1 222.7 1.89 0.12 20.24 1.96
091029 2.752 277.8 23.8 311.9 11.4 429.7 23.2 1.14 0.28 0.85 0.31 1.86 0.45 1.38 0.51
091104 191.4 7.0 205.9 2.4 407.3 23.9 3.84 0.65 3.01 0.71
091130B 80.4 3.3 98.7 0.6 1333.0 3.0 112.12 2.29 65.94 1.92
091221 93.5 1.8 106.6 0.8 190.8 3.5 22.46 1.03 6.59 0.41
100117A 105.3 26.6 193.1 13.5 320.9 35.0 17.76 1.35 23.81 5.32
100117A 296.0 52.6 337.3 11.4 1194.4 161.6 6.34 1.67 18.45 6.99
100212A 64.8 8.6 68.8 1.9 88.2 19.5 22.00 38.69 2.53 6.04
100212A 73.7 3.8 80.5 1.0 100.5 10.2 50.65 13.47 4.79 1.59
100212A 84.9 7.4 101.7 2.3 363.0 149.0 59.09 16.01 21.88 6.64
100212A 94.2 9.6 121.7 1.8 313.9 56.0 85.76 21.79 29.76 8.02
100212A 168.0 4.5 174.3 1.6 244.6 63.5 9.78 2.92 2.09 0.81
100212A 184.7 9.0 197.3 1.9 272.1 34.4 10.23 3.24 2.47 0.93
100212A 217.7 1.9 225.8 0.5 310.1 16.2 26.23 2.46 4.91 0.55
100212A 243.4 1.9 250.5 0.5 349.2 21.5 22.84 2.34 4.78 0.59
100212A 271.4 4.8 279.9 1.2 465.8 49.7 8.23 1.37 3.49 0.74
100212A 335.9 3.2 350.9 0.9 440.6 12.2 12.15 1.05 2.92 0.29
100212A 400.9 7.3 422.2 2.3 515.7 27.8 3.92 0.58 1.34 0.25
100212A 577.9 29.9 665.5 7.5 811.2 33.9 2.79 0.49 2.08 0.41
100302A 4.813 18.0 17.4 133.7 3.0 273.0 39.5 18.60 1.67 9.80 0.93 74.11 6.65 39.00 3.69
100302A 4.813 118.2 20.9 186.2 2.6 391.8 51.5 6.93 0.67 3.09 0.31 27.63 2.66 12.30 1.23
100302A 4.813 212.8 4.1 251.5 0.7 463.0 17.3 24.46 0.97 7.70 0.33 97.47 3.86 30.70 1.30
100302A 4.813 277.5 6.1 313.8 0.9 1105.3 51.9 10.19 0.38 8.52 0.38 40.60 1.53 33.90 1.50
100302A 4.813 487.7 11.4 503.4 1.7 770.2 91.1 1.24 0.36 0.71 0.25 4.94 1.43 2.85 1.00
100513A 4.772 166.6 22.9 227.2 8.6 980.8 19.2 2.04 0.14 3.17 0.38 8.01 0.56 12.40 1.48
100526A 171.3 2.6 186.7 1.0 538.6 2.9 28.40 2.00 17.41 1.59
100606A 96.2 7.6 124.9 2.1 462.9 62.5 11.87 0.71 14.43 1.86
100614A 158.1 1.1 162.2 0.4 217.4 14.2 17.05 1.51 3.91 0.66
100614A 189.7 5.7 203.1 1.7 246.8 12.5 8.61 1.16 2.06 0.43
100614A 258.4 14.3 302.4 4.8 499.7 63.0 3.45 0.32 3.30 0.58
100614A 986.9 37.5 1021.8 28.9 1095.4 39.7 0.40 0.12 0.37 0.37
100619A 29.5 4.9 88.3 0.7 151.1 1.7 438.19 22.05 143.14 7.86
100619A 850.4 3.7 949.0 1.2 1564.4 12.0 30.89 0.54 44.94 0.89
100704A 3.6 45.8 7.8 113.4 2.1 175.4 12.9 34.19 1.71 19.79 1.61 86.56 4.33 50.10 4.08
100704A 3.6 112.5 2.6 175.9 0.6 371.2 3.0 418.95 9.64 187.53 4.43 1060.55 24.39 475.00 11.20
100725B 80.9 3.8 90.2 1.3 153.7 6.1 89.20 7.97 13.98 1.79
100725B 89.9 6.6 128.6 1.7 457.9 14.1 115.75 7.76 57.51 4.15
100725B 114.3 7.7 159.8 1.3 357.4 34.9 146.67 7.76 52.74 2.94
100725B 163.1 4.1 215.7 0.6 326.1 6.6 256.22 8.98 66.22 2.36
100725B 252.4 3.1 271.6 0.6 361.2 4.6 84.85 4.62 16.19 0.95
100727A 171.3 7.3 245.5 1.8 511.9 7.0 12.35 0.46 9.13 0.39
100728A 1.567 64.3 24.6 90.1 5.6 119.1 14.2 162.58 23.17 54.19 22.05 97.74 13.93 32.60 13.30
100728A 1.567 108.9 4.8 122.1 1.1 159.1 4.6 170.61 23.94 42.14 8.89 102.57 14.39 25.30 5.34
100728A 1.567 181.8 8.5 224.6 2.9 257.1 10.0 64.95 4.13 31.33 5.95 39.05 2.48 18.80 3.57
100728A 1.567 253.7 7.6 267.3 2.9 287.6 7.5 42.08 7.73 9.74 4.31 25.30 4.65 5.85 2.59
100728A 1.567 293.9 3.3 317.5 1.0 376.8 4.2 111.86 5.09 40.78 2.93 67.25 3.06 24.50 1.76
100728A 1.567 383.0 0.7 389.4 0.3 422.6 2.2 95.79 5.11 16.10 1.26 57.58 3.07 9.68 0.76
100728A 1.567 451.2 3.1 462.4 2.1 480.4 4.5 24.57 2.56 4.94 1.33 14.77 1.54 2.97 0.80
100728A 1.567 511.5 3.2 570.1 1.2 659.3 4.9 102.62